#BookReview: The July Girls by Phoebe Locke @Wildfirebks #TheJulyGirls #damppebbles

“Every year, on the same night, another girl disappears without a trace.

Lex’s wife is missing.

She left for work the morning of a terror attack in London, and no one’s seen her since. Was Olivia among the victims or did she meet a different fate?

Addie has a secret.

That same day, her dad came home covered in blood. Addie thought he’d been hurt in the attacks, but her sister Jessie found the missing woman’s purse in his room.

Jessie says she wants to help.

She takes a job as a nanny at Lex’s house, looking after his baby. But she’s not telling him the truth. And she’s getting a little too comfortable living Olivia’s life…”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to share my review of The July Girls by Phoebe Locke. The July Girls was published by Wildfire Books on 25th June 2020 and is available in hardcover, paperback, audio and digital formats. I chose to read and review a free ARC of The July Girls but that has in no way influenced my review.

There was so much buzz around The July Girls when it was first published in hardcover back in 2019. I remember seeing a number of brilliant reviews from fellow bloggers, all encouraging me to read this book. So when I had a short break in my planned reading schedule I made a point of picking it up. And I’m so glad I did.

Ten-year-old Addie lives with her older sister, Jessie, and her dad in a rundown flat in Brixton. Life is tough. Their dad is never home and when he is, he’s usually in a foul mood. But Addie and Jessie have each other. The bond between the two sisters is strong, Addie worships her sibling. But Addie has a secret. On the same day terrorists detonated bombs across London their dad, Paul, came home covered in blood. She thought at first he’d been hurt in the attacks but other things don’t quite add up. Wracked with worry, she tells Jessie, and the girls search Paul’s room only to find a woman’s purse hidden away in a cubbyhole behind Paul’s bed. What happened to Olivia? Was she a victim of the 7/7 attacks? Or is she the latest victim of killer and serial abductor Magpie…?

The July Girls is a very readable, gritty tale of secrets and lies. I do enjoy the odd serial killer thriller but this is a completely different take on things, seen from a different angle and taken in a different direction which I enjoyed. Addie is a superb character who we meet for the first time days before her 10th birthday. Jessie promises an evening of pizza and ice cream which Addie is of course excited about, but then the 7/7 terrorist attacks hit London and everything changes. My heart broke for Addie as she wandered the streets of London alone, seeing the impact the bombs had on her community. During this time she’s unable to contact Jessie, she’s lost and alone, and her fear is palpable. These heart wrenching scenes really drew me into the story and connected me to the character. I so desperately wanted to help her, wrap her up in a hug and look after her.

I really enjoyed the way the author has written Addie’s character over the years, growing and changing as time marches on. Her behaviour, her emotions, her outlook and her dialogue all mature with her over a nine year period which I thought was very well done. What I loved most about this book though was that it wasn’t at all predictable. Everything about it felt spontaneous and surprising. The end reveal knocked me for six and I certainly did not see it coming!

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. The July Girls is a gripping story full of menace and suspense which kept me reading all day long. I loved the originality of this novel, along with how unpredictable I found it. I thought the story was intricately plotted and beautifully considered. This is the first book by this author I have read but it certainly won’t be the last. I will definitely be making a point of purchasing the author’s debut thriller The Tall Man as I really connected with Locke’s writing style. All in all, an excellent thriller which I recommend.

I chose to read and review a free ARC of The July Girls. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

The July Girls by Phoebe Locke was published in the UK by Wildfire Books on 25th June 2020 and is available in hardcover, paperback, audio and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.ukWaterstonesFoylesBook Depositorybookshop.orgGoodreadsdamppebbles bookshop.org shop |

Phoebe LockePhoebe Locke is a full-time writer, part-time doer of odd jobs. These jobs have included Christmas Elf, cocktail waitress, and childminder. Her first novel (written as Nicci Cloke), Someday Find Me, was published in 2012 and her second, Lay Me Down, in 2015. She has also written three novels for young adults: Follow Me Back (2016), Close Your Eyes (2017) and Toxic (2018).

She lives and writes in Cambridgeshire, and her debut psychological thriller is The Tall Man.

#BookReview: Kill For It by Lizzie Fry @BooksSphere #KillForIt #Giveaway #damppebbles

How far would you go for the thing you want most?
Would you… kill for it?

Cat Crawford is not especially good at her job.

Erin Goodman is the woman Cat wants to be when she’s older – smart, successful, and the best part? She’s earned it – nothing was ever handed to Erin on a plate, or to Cat.

But Erin doesn’t notice Cat. Not until something awful happens and Cat, finding herself in the right place at the right time, writes the article that goes viral. Now she’s got Erin’s attention.

The difference is, Cat knows Erin is onto her. And Cat is more than happy to toy with her colleague, especially if it gets her an even bigger story to report on.

In the game of cat and mouse, there can be only one winner.”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to share my review of Kill For It by Lizzie Fry. Kill For It was published by Sphere Books on 24th November 2022 and is available in hardcover, paperback, audio and digital formats. I chose to read a free ARC of Kill For It but that has in no way influenced my review. My grateful thanks to Beth at Sphere Books for sending me a finished copy.

Before I share my thoughts I have some very special news to share with you. The kind folk at Sphere Books have sent me a second copy of this utterly compelling cat and mouse thriller to giveaway! How brilliant is that?! One lucky UK based reader will receive a brand new, unread copy of the book. For your chance to win, head on over to the damppebbles Twitter and Instagram feeds and follow the instructions. You can enter the giveaway on both platforms doubling your chance of winning, or just the one if you prefer. Giveaway ends on Friday 20th January 2023 at midday (GMT). Good luck and believe me when I say ‘you need this book in your life’!

Journalist Erin Goodman’s home life is complicated to say the least. Her work life though is a different beast altogether. She’s successful, focussed and driven. She’s a woman succeeding in a male dominated environment and she won’t stop until the top job is hers. Cat Crawford has the same ambition but she’s on the lowest rung of the lowest ladder at Carmine Media. She aspires to be like Erin but the thought of putting the effort in just feels a little bit too much like hard work. When Erin shocks her junior colleague by taking her under her wing, Cat is both flattered and surprised. The two women begin to spend more time together until one fateful night when Cat finds herself in the wrong place at the wrong time. Wanting to share her experience she writes a piece which instantly goes viral. Suddenly Cat is the centre of attention at work and she likes how it feels. There’s a fast track to the top in sight, and for Cat, it’s within grasping distance. Providing she is willing to do whatever it takes to succeed….

Kill For It is a suspenseful page-turner of a novel which I thoroughly enjoyed from start to jaw-dropping finish. The plot is pacy and taut keeping you fully submerged in the world these characters inhabit. The characters are divine. They’re not particularly likeable but they do have moments where you can sympathise with them, even if they’re only brief. For example, as Erin’s boss says something totally inappropriate and demeaning to her for the third or fourth time that day just because he’s of a generation where that was how women were treated (not acceptable then, not acceptable now). Or when Cat’s awful boyfriend, Lawrence, is treating her badly. Again. I love a book that provokes a reaction in the reader that’s exactly what the author has achieved here with her cast of multi-layered, well-drawn characters. With misogynistic, entitled men throwing their weight around, making the big decisions, saying ‘I’m alright Jack’ and to heck with everyone else. They certainly increased my blood pressure! But the women \re just as bad, biting, scratching and backstabbing their way to the top. Doing whatever is necessary to rise above their counterparts.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. Kill For It is a highly readable, twisty thriller packed full of suspense and superb characterisation. I loved the author’s debut, The Coven, and despite Kill For It being quite different in many ways, it was just as addictive and compelling, demonstrating what a talented writer Fry is. I loved how fast paced the plot was and how interesting the author made the Bristol setting despite the majority of the action happening at Carmine Media, so a fairly featureless high-rise building. The tension and overarching sense that something ominous was going to happen was done so well. Many of the characters made my blood boil and I LOVED it. Books should absolutely make you feel something. Am I right? (Special mention to the only character in the book who I fell in love with here and that’s Asif 😍.)  I thoroughly enjoyed the time I spent with Kill For It and I look forward to seeing what the author delivers next. You can be 100% sure I’ll be reading it! Recommended.

If I’ve piqued your interest and you would like your own copy of Kill For It then please head to the damppebbles Twitter and Instagram feeds for your chance to win (UK based readers only unfortunately due to postage costs). Good luck!

I chose to read and review a free ARC of Kill For It. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

Kill For It by Lizzie Fry was published in the UK by Sphere Books on 24th November 2022 and is available in hardcover, paperback, audio and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.ukWaterstonesFoylesBook Depositorybookshop.orgGoodreadsdamppebbles bookshop.org shopdamppebbles amazon.co.uk shopdamppebbles amazon.com shop |

Lizzie Fry is a debut author of high-concept thriller The Coven (published by Sphere books), but you might know her better as L.V. Hay.

L.V.’s previous books, The Other Twin, Do No Harm and Never Have I Ever were published by Orenda and Hodder. The Other Twin is currently being adapted for the screen by Agatha Raisin producers Free@Last TV.

#BookReview: The Night Shift by Alex Finlay @AriesFiction @HoZ_Books #TheNightShift #damppebbles

“What connects a massacre at a Blockbuster video store in 1999 with the murder of four teenagers fifteen years later?

It’s New Year’s Eve of 1999 when four teenagers working late are attacked at a Blockbuster video store in New Jersey. Only one survives. Police quickly identify a suspect, the boyfriend of one of the victims, who flees and is never seen again.

Fifteen years later, four more teenagers are attacked at an ice cream store in the same town, and again only one makes it out alive.

In the aftermath of the latest crime, three lives intersect: the lone survivor of the Blockbuster massacre, who is forced to relive the horrors of her tragedy; the brother of the fugitive accused, who is convinced the police have the wrong suspect; and FBI agent Sarah Keller, who must delve into the secrets of both nights to uncover the truth about the Night Shift Murders…”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to share my review of The Night Shift by Alex Finlay. The Night Shift was published by Aries Fiction, part of Head of Zeus, in paperback format on 1st September 2022 and is also available in hardcover, audio and digital formats.

Something about The Night Shift really appealed to me. And I know exactly what it was. This book centres around a massacre which took place in a Blockbuster Video store on New Year’s Eve 1999, followed by a similar event which took place in an ice cream store fifteen years later. Everything you need to know about why I purchased and immediately read a copy of this book is in that previous sentence. Everything! The nostalgia called to me. And I can’t help it but books featuring serial or spree killers really intrigue me. There was no way I was going to let this one pass me by!

New Year’s Eve, 1999. The world holds its breath waiting to see if the dawn of the new millennium will result in untold technological chaos around the world. In Linden, New Jersey, tragedy strikes when the night shift staff of the local Blockbuster Video store are viciously attacked, leaving all but one of them – Ella Monroe – dead. Fifteen years later Ella has trained to become a therapist, helping others deal with trauma. So she’s the perfect person to call when a second attack, this time in a Linden ice cream store, leaves three of the night shift dead, and only one of the teens – Jesse Duvall – alive. The two attacks are so similar it’s hard to believe they’re not connected. But what is the connection? FBI Agent Sarah Keller is determined to uncover the truth…

The Night Shift is a very compelling psychological mystery with excellent characterisation, multiple intriguing points of view and a heart pounding ending. The story is told from three very different perspectives which makes for a riveting read. We have Ella who was the sole survivor of the 1999 Blockbuster attack. Ella is now a therapist helping other victims of trauma come to terms with what has happened to them. She’s also a mess, drinking and partying ’til the early hours whilst her unknowing fiancé is away from home. FBI Agent Sarah Keller is working with the local police force to find a link between the massacre in ’99 and the more recent ice cream parlour attack. I really liked Sarah and would go as far as saying she was my favourite character. However, she’s 8.5 months pregnant with twins and I can’t help but feel that were this not fiction, she wouldn’t be chasing down the bad guys and driving in high speed car chases! It’s also worth mentioning that this is the second (maybe more, I don’t know for sure) appearance Agent Keller has made in one of this author’s books but I didn’t discover that until I’d finished reading. It didn’t make a jot of difference to me. I felt the author told me everything I needed to know. There were no holes in her story. The third point of view is Chris Ford’s, formerly Chris Whitaker. Chris’s older brother, Vincent, was initially arrested for the Blockbuster attack fifteen years ago but the police let him slip through their fingers. Vincent hasn’t been seen since but could he be responsible for this latest attack? Chris is now a lawyer and is determined to find his brother and prove his innocence. The characters are all very well drawn, they’re interesting and really play their part in the story well.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. The Night Shift is a compelling mystery which I thoroughly enjoyed reading. I would pick up another of this author’s books without a moment’s hesitation. In fact, I’ve already added Every Last Fear to my wish list as I’ve been told how good it is by several trusted bloggers. The Night Shift is a well-plotted, well-written tale which had me glued to the pages wondering how things were going to turn out for the characters. And what a magnificent ending! I loved it, every single nail-biting second. Marvellous stuff! The Night Shift was a fantastic introduction to an author I will make a point of reading again. Gripping, compelling and very intriguing. Recommended.

The Night Shift by Alex Finlay was published in the UK by Aries Fiction on 1st September 2022 and is available in hardcover, paperback, audio and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.ukWaterstonesFoylesBook Depositorybookshop.orgGoodreadsdamppebbles bookshop.org shop |

Alex FinlayAlex Finlay is the pseudonym of an author who lives in Washington, D.C. His 2021 breakout thriller, Every Last Fear, was an Indie Next pick, a LibraryReads selection, an Amazon Editor’s Best Thriller, as well as a CNN, Newsweek, E!, BuzzFeed, Business Week, Goodreads, Parade, PopSugar, and Reader’s Digest best or most anticipated thriller of the year. Alex’s work has been translated into more than a dozen languages and optioned for film and television.

#BookReview: My Husband’s Killer by Laura Marshall @BooksSphere #MyHusbandsKiller #damppebbles

Three couples. One murder. A holiday to die for . . .

We arrived at a villa on the Amalfi Coast, ready to enjoy a sun-soaked weekend with our oldest friends – and one new face.

By the end of the weekend, my husband is found dead.

But how can I mourn him, when on the day of his funeral I discover he was having an affair?

The only suspects are the women we went on holiday with. My oldest, closest friends.

Do I really want to dig into my husband’s secret? Do I really want to know who betrayed me?

And as I start to unravel their secrets . . . do I really believe his death was an accident?”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to share my review of My Husband’s Killer by Laura Marshall. My Husband’s Killer is published by Sphere Books today (that’s Tuesday 29th November 2022) and is available in hardcover, audio and digital formats with the paperback to follow next year. I chose to read a free ARC of My Husband’s Killer but that has in no way influenced my review. My grateful thanks to Becky and the team at Sphere for sending me a proof copy.

Earlier this year I read The Anniversary by Laura Marshall and loved it! I went in blind, having not reminded myself of the blurb before starting, and was gripped from the very first page. As a result, I downloaded all of the author’s earlier novels and have been looking forward to the newest book from Marshall with bated breath. And what a treat it was! My Husband’s Killer is another cracking psychological suspense novel from a new favourite author of mine!

A dream holiday with close friends on the Amalfi Coast turns to a nightmare when Andrew, husband to Liz, and father to Ethan and Josh, goes missing. After an extensive search, no sign of Andrew is found. Local authorities presume he drowned after a drink-fuelled night in an unfamiliar location. So his friends and family return home without him. On the day of his funeral Liz makes a shocking discovery which turns her world upside down. She comes to realise one of her closest friends has a devastating secret they’ve been keeping from her. It’s the ultimate betrayal. She can’t help but question everything they’ve been through over the last 25 years and where their loyalties really lie. But in discovering who has deceived her, Liz may unwittingly find out exactly what happened to Andrew that night. And if it wasn’t an accident it raises the biggest question of all. Which of her friends killed Andrew…?

My Husband’s Killer is a suspenseful psychological thriller which I powered through keen to discover whodunit. Marshall’s writing is once again excellent. The plot builds beautifully over the course of the book, with red herrings and well-placed touches of misdirection to keep the reader guessing. There are a lot of characters in this story and my poor addled brain did lose track of who was who and how they were all related at times. But as the story progresses and you get to know the characters in a little more depth, it all becomes clear. Particularly as many of the main characters get to tell some of the story themselves. The core group of characters have known each other for a long time and have been friends/lovers since university (most of them are in their 40s now). So there is a lot of history here which I thought the author conveyed incredibly well to the reader. You really get a feel of what’s what in this friendship group before tragedy struck and I appreciated the clear and thorough backstory. The multiple timelines helped a lot in this respect. The reader gets to witness life at university for the group and the beginning of several long-term relationships, the tragic holiday to the Amalfi Coast which is the beginning of the end for Andrew, and how utterly devastating life for Liz and the boys is after Andrew’s death. The way the author provides such a believable starting point for her characters and then builds upon it, giving the reader glimpses into their lives, made me feel as though I had been on the journey with them.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. I thoroughly enjoyed My Husband’s Killer and flew through it keen to discover who was responsible for Andrew’s demise. I did manage to guess the culprit but I think I got there only a minute or two before Liz did. The plot was intriguing and kept me turning the pages. There are a lot of characters which did feel a little confusing to start with, but I soon became used to the different names and relationships. To the point where the main characters, by the end of the book, felt familiar to me. The majority of them aren’t particularly likeable but that makes them all the more interesting I feel! I enjoyed their stories. All in all, this is a suspense filled thriller which I devoured in a few short sittings. EVERYONE is a suspect, they ALL have something to hide and I was very much caught up in the mystery. A very readable, tense, compulsive novel which I recommend to fans of psychological suspense thrillers. Particularly those who like a domestic thriller.

I chose to read and review a free ARC of My Husband’s Killer. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

My Husband’s Killer by Laura Marshall was published by Sphere Books on 29th November 2022 and is available in hardcover, audio and digital formats with the paperback to follow (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.ukWaterstonesFoylesBook Depositorybookshop.orgGoodreadsdamppebbles bookshop.org shopdamppebbles amazon.co.uk shopdamppebbles amazon.com shop |

Laura MarshallLaura Marshall is the bestselling author of four psychological thrillers. Her debut novel, Friend Request, was a Kindle No.1 and Sunday Times bestseller, with over half a million copies sold in the UK. Laura’s books have sold in twenty-four territories around the globe.

She grew up in Wiltshire, studied English at the University of Sussex and currently lives in Kent with her family.

For more information visit Laura’s website www.lauramarshall.co.uk or find her at www.facebook.com/lauramarshallauthor or on Twitter @laurajm8.

#BlogTour | #BookReview: The Sanctuary by Emma Haughton @HodderBooks @HodderFiction @HodderPublicity @JennyPlatt90 #TheSanctuary #damppebbles

Very few people get to stay here. And some don’t get to leave …

Zoey doesn’t remember anything about last night. But she knows something went badly wrong. For she is no longer in New York. She’s woken up in the desert, in a white building she doesn’t recognise, and she’s alone.

When she discovers she’s been admitted to The Sanctuary, a discreet, mysterious, isolated refuge from normal life, to avoid jail, she is stunned. She knows she has secrets, troubles, but she thought she had everything under control. But as she spends more time with other residents, she begins to open up about what she’s running from. Until she realises that not everyone in The Sanctuary has her best interests at heart, and someone might even be a killer . . .”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to be joining the blog tour for The Sanctuary by Emma Haughton. The Sanctuary will be published by Hodder & Stoughton in hardcover, audio and digital formats later this week (that’s Thursday 24th November 2022) with the paperback to follow next year. I chose to read a free ARC of The Sanctuary but that has in no way influenced my review. My grateful thanks to Jenny at Hodder Books for sending me a finished copy.

I read Emma Haughton’s debut thriller, The Dark, last year and thoroughly enjoyed it. What’s really interesting about The Dark is that it’s very much a locked room thriller but the setting is a UN research station in Antartica. The way the author makes the reader feel claustrophobic in such a vast and open setting was done incredibly well. Which is why I jumped at the chance to read Haughton’s second thriller, The Sanctuary. Once again the setting really grabbed my attention. This time it’s a luxurious, isolated retreat in the heart of the Mexican desert. I was keen to see if the author would be able to evoke the same feelings of claustrophobia and of all hope being lost a second time. And oh boy, Haughton absolutely did!

Zoey wakes up alone, in a strange room and with the worst hangover she’s ever experienced. She’s dazed and confused, and her memories of the night before are hazy at best. It soon becomes clear that Zoey is in a bit of a fix. She’s been admitted to The Sanctuary, an isolated retreat for the rich and famous that likes to dabble in unorthodox treatments. And they’re making it impossible for her to leave. Zoey doesn’t understand how she has ended up in the middle of the Mexican desert, miles from home and anything resembling civilisation. The people she’s stuck with all have addictions – which she doesn’t – and they’re incredibly wealthy – which she isn’t. Which raises the question, who is Zoey’s mysterious benefactor? Who are the people she’s stranded in the middle of the desert with? And what is really going on at The Sanctuary…?

The Sanctuary is a well-written slow burn mystery which builds over the course of the book to a gripping, thrilling conclusion. The author has once again used a setting that is, in theory, vast but manages to make it feel very claustrophobic. There is no chance of escape from The Sanctuary. If dehydration or heat stroke doesn’t kill you, the wildlife probably will! I loved how well the author conveys Zoey’s rising hopelessness as her situation slowly dawned on her.

Many of the characters in the book are unlikeable and tend to frustrate and annoy each other, which adds to the overall tension at the retreat. They’re also incredibly shallow and prepared to do whatever it takes to keep a tight hold on their secrets. That’s the case for both the retreat’s affluent guests but the small body of staff present too. Zoey is the only somewhat likeable character in the bunch, but I don’t think she’ll appeal to everyone. She really does need to take a long hard look at her life as she comes across as quite juvenile a lot of the time, but I kind of liked her. The other characters all play their parts very well and help to move the storyline along. I was able to predict whodunit from fairly early on but that didn’t spoil my overall enjoyment of the book at all.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. The Sanctuary is a tense, slow burn psychological mystery with interesting characters and a thrilling conclusion. I found the book entertaining from start to finish and I’m excited to read more thrillers from this author in the future. I LOVED the setting. The author paints a very vivid picture of the inhospitable desert in her reader’s minds which I thoroughly enjoyed. The setting was as much a character in the story as Zoey, the other guests and the staff. There’s a lot of well-penned intrigue throughout the story. You can’t help but wonder what secrets these privileged people are hiding and what’s really going on at The Sanctuary. I enjoyed the slow build of the story and the escalating tension as I approached the end of the book. And the denouement was very well done. All in all, I thoroughly enjoyed The Sanctuary and look forward to reading more from the author in the future. Recommended.

I chose to read and review a free ARC of The Sanctuary. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

The Sanctuary by Emma Haughton was published in the UK by Hodder & Stoughton on 24th November 2022 and is available in hardcover, audio and digital formats with the paperback to follow (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.ukWaterstonesFoylesBook Depositorybookshop.orgGoodreadsdamppebbles bookshop.org shopdamppebbles amazon.co.uk shopdamppebbles amazon.com shop |

Emma HaughtonEmma grew up in Sussex; after a stint au pairing in Paris and a couple of half-hearted attempts to backpack across Europe, she studied English at Oxford University then trained in journalism. During her career as a journalist, she wrote many articles for national newspapers, including regular pieces for the Times Travel section.

Following publication of her picture book, Rainy Day, Emma wrote three YA novels. Her first, Now You See Me, was an Amazon bestseller and nominated for the Carnegie and Amazing Book Awards. Better Left Buried, her second, was one of the best YA reads for 2015 in the Sunday Express. Her third YA novel, Cruel Heart Broken, was picked by The Bookseller as a top YA read for July 2016.

#BookReview: The Fervor by Alma Katsu @TitanBooks #TheFervor #damppebbles

Chilling supernatural horror combining Japanese folklore with WW2 historical fiction from a multiple award-winning author.

As World War II rages on, the threat has come to the home front. In a remote corner of Idaho, Meiko Briggs and her daughter, Aiko, are desperate to return home. Following Meiko’s husband’s enlistment as an air force pilot in the Pacific months prior, Meiko and Aiko were taken from their home in Seattle and sent to one of the internment camps in the Midwest. It didn’t matter that Aiko was American-born: They were Japanese, and therefore considered a threat by the American government.

Mother and daughter attempt to hold on to elements of their old life in the camp when a mysterious disease begins to spread among those interned. What starts as a minor cold quickly becomes spontaneous fits of violence and aggression, even death. And when a disconcerting team of doctors arrive, nearly more threatening than the illness itself, Meiko and her daughter team up with a newspaper reporter and widowed missionary to investigate, and it becomes clear to them that something more sinister is afoot: a demon from the stories of Meiko’s childhood, hell-bent on infiltrating their already strange world.

Inspired by the Japanese yokai and the jorogumo spider demon, THE FERVOR explores a supernatural threat beyond what anyone saw coming: the danger of demonization, a mysterious contagion, and the search to stop its spread before it’s too late.”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to share my review of The Fervor by Alma Katsu. The Fervor is published by Titan Books today (that’s Friday 7th October 2022) and is available in paperback and digital formats. I chose to read and review a free eARC of The Fervor but that has in no way influenced my review.

Alma Katsu is the author behind one of my favourite reads of 2021. The incredibly dark and atmospheric The Hunger which reimagines the journey the Donner Party took from Illinois to California in 1846. The author takes historical events, gives them a supernatural twist and presents them in a highly compelling way. I loved what Katsu did with The Hunger. So much so that I immediately purchased the author’s next book, The Deep (which I plan to read very, very soon). So when the opportunity to read The Fervor presented itself I, of course, leapt at the chance to immerse myself in this author’s world once again.

Meiko Briggs was sent by her parents from Japan to America as a young woman where she met her husband, pilot Jamie Briggs. Now America is at war with Japan and life for those with Japanese heritage, which includes Meiko and Jamie’s young daughter, Aido, has changed significantly. Whilst Jamie is off overseas fighting for his country, his wife and daughter have been moved to an internment camp where everyday life is tough. When a mystery illness starts to spread throughout the camp and internees become violent before some die a painful death, Meiko knows there is something sinister going on. Particularly when victims report seeing entities that remind her of Japanese folklore tales from her childhood. Meiko knows she and Aiko are in danger but exactly who (or what) poses the biggest threat to their lives…?

The Fervor is a well-written tale full of intrigue and suspense which I enjoyed. There is a lot for the reader to get their teeth into as the story is told from four different points of view; Meiko, her daughter Aiko, preacher Archie Mitchell, and Fran Gurstwold, a news reporter who is out to make her name with a big story. There is an ever-present sense of threat throughout the book which I thought was handled incredibly well by the author. It doesn’t really matter where the reader looks, there’s danger at every turn! But who or what poses the biggest threat? I have my theory and it doesn’t bode well for humankind. It was shocking to read how Japanese people were treated at the internment camps of the 1940s. How misinformation and fear drove people to act in the most despicable of ways. How the white supremacy groups preyed on the insecurities of average people to amass armies ready to hurt, maim and kill without a moment’s thought. The author builds an uncomfortable picture for her readers and rightly so. It should be uncomfortable; it should make us think. But most of it, we must learn from the atrocities of the past and make sure they never happen again.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. The Fervor is a well-written, unsettling novel full of suspense which I found uncomfortable reading at times but hard to put down. Despite being set in the 1940s during WWII it felt a very current story with overarching themes of racism and an unknown prevalent virus with no cure, at the heart of the novel. There’s no shying away from the cold, hard truth here. Katsu is a skilled writer who brings her characters and their stories to life. The lead characters were interesting and engaging throughout. I enjoyed the way in which the author tied everything together in the end, bringing the separate strands of the plot to a believable and tense conclusion. All in all, I found The Fervor to be a compelling novel with a beautifully crafted sense of threat running throughout the pages. Recommended.

I chose to read and review a free eARC of The Fervor. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

The Fervor by Alma Katsu was published in the UK by Titan Books on 7th October 2002 and is available in paperback and audio formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.ukWaterstonesFoylesBook Depositorybookshop.orgdamppebbles bookshop.org shopdamppebbles amazon.co.uk shopdamppebbles amazon.com shop |

Alma KatsuAuthor of THE DEEP, a reimagining of the sinking of the Titanic, and THE HUNGER, a reimagining of the Donner Party’s tragic journey (Putnam);
THE TAKER, THE RECKONING and THE DESCENT (Gallery Books). The Taker was selected by ALA/Booklist as one of the top ten debut novels of 2011.

#BookReview: The Axe Woman by Håkan Nesser (translated by Sarah Death) @MantleBooks #TheAxeWoman #damppebbles

“Sweden 2012. When Inspector Gunnar Barbarotti returns to work after a terrible personal tragedy his boss asks him to investigate a cold case, hoping to ease him back gently into his police duties.

Five years previously a shy electrician, Arnold Morinder, disappeared from the face of the earth, the only clue his blue moped abandoned in a nearby swamp. At the time his partner, Ellen Bjarnebo, claimed that Arnold had probably travelled to Norway never to return. But Ellen is one of Sweden’s most notorious killers, having served eleven years in prison after killing her abusive first husband and dismembering his body with an axe. And when Barbarotti seeks to interview Ellen in relation to Arnold’s disappearance she is nowhere to be found . . .

But without a body and no chance of interviewing his prime suspect Barbarotti must use all the ingenuity at his disposal to make headway in the case. Still struggling with his personal demons, Barbarotti seeks solace from God, and the support of his colleague, Eva Backman. And as he finally begins to track down his suspect and the cold case begins to thaw, Barbarotti realizes that nothing about Ellen Bjarnebo can be taken for granted . . .

The Axe Woman is the fifth and final Inspector Barbarotti novel from bestselling author Håkan Nesser.”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to share my review of The Axe Woman by Håkan Nesser (translated by Sarah Death). The Axe Woman was published by Mantle Books on 1st September 2022 and is available in hardcover, audio and digital formats. I chose to read and review a free ARC of The Axe Woman but that has in no way influenced my review. My grateful thanks to Chloe at Mantle Books for sending me a finished copy.

As a fairly avid reader of crime fiction I have a number of rules when choosing a book. The biggest one being (and this is a lesson learnt through time and experience) when reading serialised detective fiction always, ALWAYS start at the beginning with the first book. Never, NEVER go into a series part-way through. But there are occasions when the look and the sound of the book are just too tempting, and it becomes almost impossible to resist. Which is what happened when The Axe Woman by Håkan Nesser landed on my radar. Despite being the fifth (and final!) book in the series, I couldn’t let this one pass me by, so I shoved the rules to one side and got stuck into this excellent novel as soon as it arrived at damppebbles HQ.

Inspector Gunnar Barbarotti returns to work following a personal tragedy only for his senior officer to ask him to investigate a five-year-old cold case. It feels to Barbarotti as though he’s been given ‘busy work’. Something to test whether he’s fit to return to the force, a task to gently ease him back in before being given a more challenging case. But he can’t be sure of Asunander’s motives so decides to investigate the disappearance of Arnold Morinder to the best of his ability. Morinder disappeared from the town of Kymlinge, Sweden without a trace in August 2007. Reported missing three days later by his partner Ellen Bjarnebo, no trace of Morinder (apart from his discarded blue moped) was ever found. But the name Ellen Bjarnebo is well known to the local police. Ellen Bjarnebo, or Helgesson as she was previously known, is the notorious Axe Woman of Little Burma. A woman who twenty years ago killed her husband and took an axe to his body to hide the evidence. Barbarotti is determined to track the elusive Axe Woman of Little Burma down and get to the bottom of what happened to Morinder. Who really is Ellen Bjarnebo, why did she kill her first husband in such a brutal manner and what does she know about the disappearance of Arnold Morinder…?

The Axe Woman is a masterfully written and very compelling piece of crime fiction which I thoroughly enjoyed. I was initially a little concerned about reading the fifth book in a series, despite being strongly drawn to this one, but at the very start of the novel a tragedy befalls Barbarotti and, despite having never read any of the previous books, I could feel the character had been signigicantly altered. This isn’t perhaps the version of Barbarotti those more familiar with the series know. I must say I absolutely adored the characters in this book. For me, the characters can make or break a novel, but in this instance they only added to the overall appeal of the book. They felt real and believable, I became invested in them. So much so that I will be going back to the first book in the series so I can get to know the regulars better.

Told in the past and present, and from a number of different points of view, this beautifully written slow-burn mystery delivers on every count. The suspense is handled extremely well keeping the reader immersed in the story. On the odd occasion when I did have to put the book down, I was always excited to return to the novel and be reunited with Barbarotti and DI Eva Backman. At times I thought I knew where the storyline was heading, but I was wrong. The reveal is delivered in such a way that it’s really quite shocking, which I appreciated.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. The Axe Woman is an expertly written mystery which had me glued to the pages and immersed in a world I didn’t want to leave. It’s very clear to me why Håkan Nesser is so well thought of in the crime fiction world; his writing, his characters and his settings are superbly constructed, and I cannot wait to read more by this author. The Axe Woman is an intelligent, heartfelt, somewhat emotional novel which can easily be read as a standalone, despite being the fifth and final book in the series. Yes, you do miss out on some of the history between the characters, the odd reference to an earlier case, but The Axe Woman is written in such a way that as you progress through the book, you learn everything you need to know. If I didn’t know better and I just picked this book up off the shelf, I would have assumed it was a standalone mystery. I’m certainly not qualified to say this having only read one book but this felt a fitting end to the series. Everything is tied off neatly and with understated style. No big, showy fireworks but with a decision that could lead to something…or nothing at all. A superb character-driven novel which I thoroughly enjoyed losing myself in. Recommended.

I chose to read and review a free ARC of The Axe Woman. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

The Axe Woman by Håkan Nesser (translated by Sarah Death) was published in the UK by Mantle Books on 1st September 2022 and is available in hardcover, audio and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.uk | Waterstones | Foyles | Book Depository | bookshop.org | Goodreads | damppebbles bookshop.org shop | damppebbles amazon.co.uk shop | damppebbles amazon.com shop |

Håkan Nesser

Håkan Nesser is a Swedish author and teacher who has written a number of successful crime fiction novels. He has won Best Swedish Crime Novel Award three times, and his novel Carambole won the Glass Key award in 2000. His books have been translated from Swedish into numerous languages.

Håkan Nesser was born and grew up in Kumla, and has lived most of his adult life in Uppsala. His first novel was published in 1988, but he worked as a teacher until 1998 when he became a full-time author. In August, 2006, Håkan Nesser and his wife Elke moved to Greenwich Village in New York.

Sarah DeathSarah Death is a translator, literary scholar, and editor of the UK-based journal Swedish Book Review. Her translations from the Swedish include Ellen Mattson’s Snow, for which she won the Bernard Shaw Translation Prize. She lives and works in Kent, England.

#BookReview: The Way It Is Now by Garry Disher @ViperBooks #TheWayItIsNow #damppebbles

WHO SHALL INHERIT THE SINS OF THE FATHER?

Twenty years ago, Charlie Deravin’s mother went missing, believed murdered. Her body has never been found, and his father has lived under a cloud of suspicion ever since.

Now Charlie has returned to the coastal town where his mother vanished, on disciplinary leave from his job with the police sex-crimes unit, and permanent leave from his marriage. After two decades worrying away at the mystery of his mother’s disappearance, he’s run out of leads.

Then the skeletal remains of two people are found in the excavation of a new building site… and the past comes crashing in on Charlie.
From the multiple Ned Kelly Award-winning author of Consolation comes a stunning new standalone thriller, for readers of Jane Harper, Ian Rankin and Chris Hammer.

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to share my review of The Way It Is Now by Garry Disher. The Way It Is Now was published by Viper Books on 4th August 2022 and is available in hardcover, audio and digital formats with the paperback to follow. I chose to read and review a free ARC of The Way It Is Now but that has in no way influenced my review. My grateful thanks to Rosie at Viper Books for sending me a proof copy.

Regular visitors to the blog may be aware that I’m what you could call ‘a little bit obsessed with Australian crime fiction’. Only a little, mind you 😜. One of the big names in Aussie crime fiction that I have been desperate to read for some time now is Garry Disher. I’ve been accumulating his Paul Hirschhausen books over time but gaps in my reading schedule have been few and far between, meaning I haven’t had a chance to pick one of Disher’s titles up as yet. Until now, that is. I jumped at the chance to read The Way It Is Now, a standalone novel by this much revered and respected author of Australian crime fiction. And what a treat it was!

Charlie Deravin’s mother disappeared without a trace twenty years ago. Now Charlie, a police officer on enforced leave following an altercation with his boss, is determined to find out what happened to her. However, Charlie cannot catch a break and comes up against dead end after dead end following years of searching for the truth. Speculation within the town where the Deravins lived has always been rife with Charlie’s father, Rhys, an ex-detective himself, firmly in the spotlight. Then one day the remains of two bodies are found in the grounds of a derelict property and life for the Deravin family will never be the same again…

The Way It Is Now is a very compelling and hugely absorbing mystery featuring an extremely well-written and multi-layered lead character in Charlie Deravin. This is Charlie’s story, documented across many years detailing his grief at the loss of this mother and his obsession with finding out what happened to her. Her car was abandoned one day with her possessions strewn across the road. To the casual observer it looked as though Rose Deravin had been abducted. But the police investigation failed to get off of the ground, particularly as the police already had their prime suspect in their sights. Now all they had to do was prove Rhys Deravin guilty, one way or another. Did Rhys kill Rose twenty years ago to prevent their divorce and the sale of their family home? What I loved about The Way It Is Now is that you can never really be sure of Rhys Deravin. Whether he’s guilty or innocent. There were always questions in my mind. Things which didn’t quite add up. I felt he was untrustworthy, part of the old boy’s network of cops back in the day, ‘turn a blind eye because he’s one of us’ and all of that. It made for gripping reading and kept me turning the pages late into the night.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. I thoroughly enjoyed The Way It Is Now and I am even more excited to get started on Disher’s Paul Hirschhausen series now. The Way It Is Now is a tense, unsettling, slow burn mystery with strong characterisation, a vivid setting and a highly intriguing storyline which I couldn’t get enough of. I really liked how Disher developed Charlie over the course of the book. There were softer, more emotional moments which were unexpected but endeared me to Charlie’s character even more. All in all, I very much enjoyed this book and look forward to experiencing the author’s writing again very soon. Recommended.

I chose to read and review a free ARC of The Way It Is Now. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

The Way It Is Now by Garry Disher was published in the UK by Viper Books on 4th August 2022 and is available in hardcover, audio and digital formats with the paperback to follow (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.uk | Waterstones | Foyles | Book Depository | bookshop.org | Goodreads | damppebbles bookshop.org shop | damppebbles amazon.co.uk shop | damppebbles amazon.com shop |

Garry DisherGarry Disher lives in Australia and is the author of over 40 books: novels, short story collections, writers’ handbooks, history textbooks and children’s fiction. His Challis and Destry police procedurals, and his Wyatt crime from the inside thrillers, are gaining international recognition, winning best crime novel of the year awards in Australia and Germany and appearing on best books of the year lists in the USA. Garry has toured Germany twice and the States once, and counts a scholarship year spent in the Stanford University creative writing school, early in his career, as one of his most important formative experiences.

#BookReview: The Watchers by A.M. Shine @AriesFiction @HoZ_Books #TheWatchers #damppebbles #20booksofsummer22

“You can’t see them. But they can see you.

This forest isn’t charted on any map. Every car breaks down at its treeline. Mina’s is no different. Left stranded, she is forced into the dark woodland only to find a woman shouting, urging Mina to run to a concrete bunker. As the door slams behind her, the building is besieged by screams.

Mina finds herself in a room with a wall of glass, and an electric light that activates at nightfall, when the Watchers come above ground. These creatures emerge to observe their captive humans and terrible things happen to anyone who doesn’t reach the bunker in time.

Afraid and trapped among strangers, Mina is desperate for answers. Who are the Watchers and why are these creatures keeping them imprisoned, keen to watch their every move?”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to share my review of The Watchers by A.M. Shine. The Watchers was published by Aries Fiction on 12th May 2022 and is available in all formats. I was very keen to read this book. So much so that I made it part of two different reading challenges to ensure I got to it – 12 Books in 12 Months and 20 Books of Summer 2022. The Watchers is the fifth book I’ve read as part of 12 books and the eighth book I’ve read as part of 20 books of Summer 2022 (yes, I am very behind with 20 books this year! 😬).

When Mina is promised a couple of hundred euro by a bloke in the pub for delivering a Golden Conure to a collector in Connemara, she finds it hard to refuse. But the promised easy drive, along with the draw of easy money starts to look a lot like hard work when her car breaks down at the edge of a forest. Armed with the bird and little else, Mina sets out to find a mechanic to get her back on the road. The first person she sees however is a woman who screams at her to take shelter. Because this forest isn’t on any map and all cars that approach the area break down at the treeline. The woods and the night belong to the watchers. And now so does Mina….

The Watchers is a beautifully written horror novel which will send shivers down your spine and make you think twice before turning the light out. With shades of the epic Bird Box, this creepy and claustrophobic story gets under the readers skin. Mina and her fellow captives are watched like animals in a zoo on a nightly basis. They’re starved of sleep by the ever present light which remains on during the hours of darkness, whilst being subjected to the most terrifying screams as the creatures try to scratch and claw their way through the glass wall. Escape from the creatures is impossible. The trek out of the forest too vast to conquer within the hours of daylight. The risk of failure too terrifying to contemplate. The tension is perfectly pitched, the eeriness is sublimely written and the sense of desperation from the characters was palpable.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. The Watchers is a beautifully written classic horror novel with a gothic feel and poetic prose which I thoroughly enjoyed. I loved the tension, the suspense and how utterly unnerving I found the story. I was drawn to this book thanks to several factors. Two of the main reasons being the gorgeous cover and the incredible reviews from fellow bloggers and reviewers. The hype is real. A stunning, creepy setting, eerie creatures to make your skin crawl, superb characters who the reader really gets the measure of. And a shocking, well-penned twist which left me reeling. It’s a stunning debut from an author to watch and I cannot wait to get my mitts on a copy of the author’s next book, The Creeper, when it publishes in September.

The Watchers by A.M. Shine was published in the UK by Aries Fiction on 12th May 2022 and is available in hardcover, paperback, audio and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.uk | Waterstones | Foyles | Book Depository | bookshop.org | Goodreads | damppebbles bookshop.org shop |


A.M. ShineA. M. Shine is an author of Literary Horror from the west of Ireland. It was there that at a young age he discovered a passion for classic horror stories, and where he received his Masters in history, before ultimately sharpening his quill to pursue a life devoted to all things literary and macabre. His writing is inspired by the trinity of horror, history, and superstition, and he has tormented, toyed with, and tortured more characters than he will ever confess to.

Owing to a fascination with the works of Edgar Allan Poe and his ilk, A. M. Shine’s earlier writings were Gothic in their style and imagination. When his focus turned to novels he refined his craft as an author of Irish horror – stories influenced by his country’s culture, landscape, and language, but which draw their dark atmosphere and eloquence from the Gothic canon of his past.

#BookReview: Everyone In My Family Has Killed Someone by Benjamin Stevenson @MichaelJBooks #EveryoneInMyFamilyHasKilledSomeone #damppebbles

Everyone in my family is a killer. Everyone in my family is a suspect. But which of them is a murderer?
_________

I was dreading the Cunningham family reunion even before the first murder.

You see, us Cunnighams don’t really get along.

We’ve only got one thing in common: we’ve all killed someone.

So when they find the first body, it’s clear that only a Cunningham could have committed the crime – and it’s up to me to prove it.

There are plenty of killers in my family. But only one murderer . . .”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to share my review of Everyone In My Family Has Killed Someone by Benjamin Stevenson. Everyone In My Family Has Killed Someone was published by Penguin Michael Joseph last week (that’s Thursday 18th August 2022) and is available in hardcover, audio and digital formats with the paperback to follow at a later date. I chose to read and review a free ARC of Everyone In My Family Has Killed Someone but that has in no way influenced my review. My grateful thanks to Ellie and Jen at Penguin Michael Joseph for sending me a proof copy.

The Cunningham family have one thing in common, other than a bloodline, and that’s that they have all killed someone. So when Ernest Cunningham receives an invitation to a family reunion, he knows it isn’t going to be a pleasant few nights away reminiscing about days gone by, immersed in nostalgia. Truth be told, he’s not all that keen on anyone in his family, other than his step-sister, so the thought of spending time with them fills him with anxiety. His worst fears are confirmed when a body is discovered at the ski resort the family are staying at. Surrounded by killers, knowing he can’t trust anyone, particularly those he’s related to, it’s down to Ernest to try and work out who amongst his family is a murderer…

Everyone In My Family Has Killed Someone is a very engaging nod to classic crime with an expertly executed contemporary twist. It’s highly readable, difficult to put down and laugh out loud funny. I adored the lead character, Ernest, and felt in capable hands as he led me through the intricacies of his somewhat suspicious family. Ernest is a writer of ‘how to’ guides for those wanting to pen detective fiction. He’s not written his own novel but provides help and assistance to other budding novelists. As a result, Ernest abides by the rules of Ronald Knox’s 10 commandments of Detective Fiction, 1929. Helpfully there is a list of the rules at the start of the book, just in case you’re not familiar with them (but I’m sure we all are 😜). But any regular reader of detective fiction can probably come up with a few rules off the top of their head (the criminal must be someone mentioned in the story and not suddenly appear as if by magic, that sort of thing!). Because of Ernest’s penchant for following the rules he is very open and honest with the reader, declaring that everything he tells you is the truth. He goes on to inform the reader which pages feature gory deaths, just in case you’re only in it for grisly bits, which I thought was wonderful. I couldn’t help but fall a little in love with Ernest and I don’t think I’ll be the only one to feel affection for this superbly written character.

The mystery aspect of the novel is clever, highly intriguing and full of red herrings. I appreciated every perfectly placed twist and turn. Was I able to work out whodunit? No, I wasn’t. I was just enjoying the ride! There are a lot of characters in the story – quite a few members of the Cunningham clan, several resort staff, other guests and police officers. Normally with such a large cast I would be concerned about becoming muddled but that is not the case in Everyone In My Family Has Killed Someone. All of the characters are defined well and play their part beautifully, helping to move the story along.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. Everyone In My Family Has Killed Someone is a wonderfully written mystery which I enjoyed every single moment of. I loved the setting which despite being large in scale, felt quite claustrophobic due to the weather cutting the resort off from the rest of the world. Oh, and it’s Australian so that’s extra points from me as I’m quite obsessed with Aussie crime fiction, as regular readers of the blog will know! I thought the plot was masterfully written, something Dame Christie would herself be proud of. With superb characters and an intriguing mystery at its heart, Everyone In My Family Has Killed Someone is a brilliantly written ode to the golden age of crime which this reader very much appreciated. Very funny, smart and cleverly done. Recommended.

I chose to read and review a free ARC of Everyone In My Family Has Killed Someone. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

Everyone In My Family Has Killed Someone by Benjamin Stevenson was published in the UK by Penguin Michael Joseph on 18th August 2022 and is available in hardcover, audio and digital formats with the paperback to follow (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.ukWaterstonesFoylesBook Depositorybookshop.orgGoodreadsdamppebbles bookshop.org shop |

Photo of author Benjamin Stevenson.Benjamin Stevenson is an award-winning stand-up comedian and author. His first novel, Greenlight, was shortlisted for the Ned Kelly Award for Best Debut Crime Fiction, and published in the USA and UK. His second novel, Either Side of Midnight, was shortlisted for the International Thriller Writers Award for Best Original Paperback. His novella, Find Us, was an internationally bestselling audiobook. He has sold out live shows from the Melbourne International Comedy Festival all the way to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival and has appeared on ABCTV, Channel 10 and The Comedy Channel. Off-stage, Benjamin has worked for publishing houses and literary agencies in Australia and the USA. He currently works with some of Australia’s best-loved authors at Curtis Brown Australia. He loves hearing from readers on Instagram (@stevensonexperience) and Facebook (The Stevenson Experience). Everyone in My Family Has Killed Someone is his third novel.

© https://benjaminstevensonauthor.com