#BookReview: Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton #ThreeHours #damppebbles

“THREE HOURS TO SAVE THE PEOPLE YOU LOVE

In rural Somerset in the middle of a blizzard, the unthinkable happens: a school is under siege.

Pupils and teachers barricade themselves into classrooms, the library, the theatre. The headmaster lies wounded in the library, unable to help his trapped students and staff. Outside, a police psychiatrist must identify the gunmen, while parents gather desperate for news.

In three intense hours, all must find the courage to stand up to evil and save the people they love.”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to be sharing my review of Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton. Three Hours was published by Penguin Books on 29th October 2020 and is available in all formats. I couldn’t resist this book after seeing so many wonderful reviews.

However, I have been umming and ahhring about writing my review. Why? Because Three Hours absolutely broke me. Never has a book had such a powerful effect on me. It’s a sublime read but utterly devastating. I loved it but it ended up changing my mood.  It made me terribly sad and I hugged my kids just that little bit tighter because of it. Three Hours will stay with me forever.

On a snowy December day, oblivious to what is about to happen, the parents of Cliff Heights School drop their children off believing it to be just like any other school day. Only an hour later, the children start texting and tweeting their parents. There’s a gunman in the school. They’re terrified and hiding for their lives. The parents rush to the school but they’re turned away by the police, they feel helpless and can only watch from afar. The clock is ticking…

I’ve never read such a tense, compelling novel before. My heart was in my mouth from the very start and it stayed there throughout. I was living and breathing the story alongside the characters, like a movie playing in my mind. And the terror felt real. It was insane how deeply this book burrowed its way into my being. It was such an intense, emotional experience reading Three Hours.

I felt there were two sides to this story. You have the human side; the kids and teachers trapped in the school in fear for their lives, the parents being kept at a distance whilst being utterly helpless. And then you have the technical side; the police analysing every move the gunman makes, trying to pre-empt any demands and the reasons for carrying out such a horrific act. I loved the juxtaposition of these two faces – emotional versus technical and scientific. It’s a true race against time and I was on the edge of my seat throughout.

I had a feeling I knew where one of the plotlines in the book was heading but it still broke my heart into a million pieces when the truth was revealed. The author has written such an immersive, current and hypnotic novel. The bravery shown by the kids, the resilience and determination shown by the teachers, and the heartbreak shown by the parents makes for absorbing reading.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. Reading Three Hours was such an experience for me that it will be impossible to forget. Beautifully written, full of drama and shedloads of terror-filled suspense. I devoured the book. It affected me greatly. Recommended.

Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton was published by Penguin Books on 29th October 2020 and is available in paperback, audio and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.uk | WaterstonesFoylesBook Depositorybookshop.orgGoodreadsdamppebbles bookshop.org shop |

Rosamund Lupton is the author of four novels.

Rosamund Lupton graduated from Cambridge University in 1986. After reviewing books for the Literary Review and being invited to join the Royal Court Theatre, she won a television play competition and subsequently worked as a screen writer. Her debut novel Sister, was a BBC Radio 4 Book at Bedtime, a Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller, has been translated into over thirty languages and has international sales of over 1.5 million copies. It was the fastest-selling debut of 2010 by a British author, and was winner of the Richard and Judy Best Debut Novel of 2011 Award and the Strand Magazine Critics First Novel Award. Film rights of Sister are currently under option.

Lupton’s critically acclaimed second novel Afterwards also went straight into the Sunday Times bestseller lists and was the No. 2 Sunday Times fiction bestseller of 2011. The Quality of Silence her third novel was a Sunday Times best seller and a Richard & Judy bookclub pick

Her new novel Three Hours is a Sunday Times top ten best seller and a best book of 2020 in the Sunday Times, the Times, Guardian, Telegraph, Stylist, Red & Good Housekeeping. It’s a Times and Sunday Times thriller of the month.

#BlogTour | #GuestReview: Yearn To Fear by Chas Murrell (@MurrellChas) @cobaltdinosaur #YearnToFear #damppebbles

“The greatest scientific invention of modern times…
Capable of curing humanity…
But more adept at controlling it…

Sydney scientist, Marcus Hall, is developing a radical 5G Wi-Fi receiver for CSIRO. With access to secretive Lamarr computer chips – this technology promises billions to repair Australia’s ravaged economy. On a caffeine boosted whim, he inadvertently discovers a therapeutic breakthrough in neuroscience. Or so he thinks…

His seemingly trustworthy lab partner, Henry, is an unlikely Australian spy. His official duty is keeping tabs on the project and their Lamarr chips. But the whole project is now classified top-secret.
Marcus remains blissfully unaware of the many secrets surrounding him, until he witnesses the graphic murder of a colleague. Could this event reveal Henry as a master deceiver and ruthless double agent? Will the scientific discovery be fatal for Marcus, those he loves, and the one he yearns for? Marcus faces a soul tearing dilemma: is the only means of stopping the carnage to weaponise his prototype?

Foreign intelligence agencies realise the top-secret breakthrough is priceless. One particular spy leads the race to seize the invention. A psychological master of the long game, espionage, and extortion, his only rule according to Kung Fu: Win.

Friend and foe alike confront this psychotic mastermind. All will FEAR him, but is their FEAR real? Only the next six minutes will tell…”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. Today I’m handing the blog over to my guest reviewer, Ryan, who is going to share his review of Yearn to Fear by Chas Murrell as part of the blog tour. Yearn to Fear was published on 18th November 2020 and is available in paperback and digital formats. Ryan chose to read and review a free digital copy of Yearn to Fear but that has in no way influenced his review.

Yearn to Fear is the debut novel from Chas Murrell and what is very impressive about this book is that Chas has his own distinct style already. Yearn to Fear is not a formulaic spy thriller, nor is it a dry police procedural. Rather it is a character driven espionage, spy thriller with weapons! It’s intriguing, it’s different and it’s well worth a read!

Yearn to Fear follows Marcus and Henry as they work at CSIRO on a new telecommunication chip. The work isn’t showing promising results but after one experiment they discover the unexpected power of the Lamarr chip. The chip can bring benefits to the users and the potential market is suddenly much bigger than the 5G companies. This is something that everyone wants to get their hands on and they will stop at nothing to get it!

Once we realise the power of the chip, the reader is plunged headlong into an exciting adventure where everyone we met in the first half of the book suddenly starts to show their true colours. When you have something every government would kill for, who can you trust? Each character starts to evolve; we see what drives them, we see more of their true purpose and that means things will get messy. Throw in a handful of heavies, some special ops and of the course the local police and you get a story you will not want to put down. I felt intrigued as to where this was going to go, who was really out to get who, and who may not be who they seem. There were definitely twists and surprises in this one that left me shocked.

I must say I found the first half of the story a little slow. The character building and the scientific explanation of what the Lamarr chip may or may not be doing felt carefully paced. However Murrell is teeing up the story for an explosive second half and what promises to be an interesting sequel. Not once as a reader did I feel overawed by the science, or the implications. The author moved the plot along at a rapid pace without befuddling the reader.

The interesting benefit of setting a story around a massive research institute like CSIRO is that you are allowed very intelligent characters.  Leaps of logic that in other books would seem out of place, were cleverly explained by the author. The ‘good guys’ didn’t just have to rely on serendipity and bullets in this novel. Brains were allowed and the mental chess game with the enemy spy made for entertaining reading.

I would recommend Yearn to Fear to anyone looking for a different take on the spy thriller and looking to find a new go-to author.

Ryan chose to read and review a free digital copy of Yearn to Fear. The above review is his own unbiased opinion.

Yearn to Fear by Chas Murrell was published in the UK on 18th November 2020 and is available in paperback and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.ukamazon.comWaterstonesdamppebbles bookshop.org shopGoodreads |

Chas Murrell has been a Police Officer, Senior Fire Commander, Customs Coastwatch surveillance mission co-ordinator, heavy machinery mechanic, emergency medical technician/ instructor, film extra, and General Manager of an event company. He has published academic papers on liquid hydrogen and held a worldwide provisional patent for a nonlinear mathematical calculation. He survived Australia’s largest gas BLEVE in 1987, and has provided operational support to some of Australia’s largest natural disasters in North Queensland.

On a personal level he has suffered from relentless and debilitating migraines all his life, is father to four and pop to two. He and his artistically entrepreneurial wife live in Tasmania, which looks very much like Scotland and they wouldn’t have it any other way. A direct descendant of Robert the Bruce (King of Scots), history runs deep in Chas’s veins, along with a profound knowledge of both World Wars. You may even come across him online playing World of Tanks.

In his Australian spy thriller books you will get to know Chas’s knowledge of technology, intrigue, crime, espionage, weaponry, banter, romance and even whisky… yet above all, there is believability and no loose ends.

#BookReview: Harrow Lake by Kat Ellis @PenguinUKBooks #HarrowLake #damppebbles

“Lola Nox is the daughter of a celebrated horror filmmaker – she thinks nothing can scare her. But when her father is brutally attacked in their New York apartment, she’s swiftly packed off to live with a grandmother she’s never met in Harrow Lake, the eerie town where her father’s most iconic horror movie was shot.

The locals are weirdly obsessed with the film that put their town on the map – and there are strange disappearances, which the police seem determined to explain away.

And there’s someone – or something – stalking Lola’s every move.

The more she discovers about the town, the more terrifying it becomes. Because Lola’s got secrets of her own. And if she can’t find a way out of Harrow Lake, they might just be the death of her…”

Hello and welcome to a brand new day on damppebbles. Today I am delighted to be sharing my review of the creepy Harrow Lake by Kat Ellis. Harrow Lake was published by Penguin in paperback, audio and digital formats on 9th July 2020. This book was impossible to resist so I treated myself to a copy and I’m so glad I did (check out the glorious yellow sprayed edges!).

Lola Nox lives in the shadow of her famous horror filmmaker father, Nolan, and her absent movie star mother, Lorelei. After a devastating event at home she’s sent to Harrow Lake, the small town her mother grew up in, to stay with her grandmother. A grandmother she’s never met before. In a town which featured in her father’s most famous film, Nightjar, the film which made Lorelei a star. On arrival she discovers everyone in Harrow Lake is obsessed with her mother and Nightjar. To the point where they hold a regular festival and parade for the tourists. There’s literally no escape! But Harrow Lake has its own secrets and as Lola starts to dig deeper, she find out about the missing girls. Who – or what – is responsible for their disappearance? And will Lola be next…?

Harrow Lake is a compulsive and chilling YA horror novel which sent shivers down my spine. It’s a modern-day take on an 80s horror movie and I enjoyed every single moment of it. Not only is Harrow Lake a creep-fest but to ratchet things up a notch it has its own town legend – Mister Jitters. The residents live in fear and carry out macabre practices such as leaving their teeth tied to the bone tree to stop Mister Jitters from wanting to get a taste of their bones (😱). It’s the stuff nightmares are made of and Ellis has told such a vivid tale that you feel at times like you’re actually living the horror alongside Lola.

I couldn’t get enough of the setting nor the characters who all stand tall. Lola was difficult to like initially but you grow to like and admire her. I was with her every step of the way (despite wishing I wasn’t at times). Lola’s grandmother made me feel uncomfortable from the first meet. She’s a closed-off, odd woman who has plenty of devastating secrets of her own. There are some pretty unlikeable, well-written characters in Harrow Lake and their strange behaviour and peculiar ways really kept me on my toes.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. Harrow Lake is a very immersive, vivid tale and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I loved the small town feel of the story, the claustrophobia and the heaps of unease the author has woven into the book. It’s a compelling YA novel which I heartily recommend to young and *erm* slightly older horror fans. I would make sure you pick up a copy soon otherwise Mister Jitters may come-a-knocking… Recommended.

Harrow Lake by Kat Ellis was published in the UK by Penguin on 9th July 2020 and is available in paperback, audio and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | bookshop.orgamazon.co.ukWaterstonesFoylesBook DepositoryGoodreadsthe damppebbles bookshop.org shop |

Kat EllisKat Ellis is the author of YA novels HARROW LAKE, PURGE, BLACKFIN SKY, and BREAKER, and the novella THE TWINS OF BLACKFIN in the THREE STRIKES collection. Her next book, BURDEN FALLS, will be published in the summer of 2021.

You’ll usually find Kat up to no good on Twitter, trekking through ruins and cemeteries with her camera, or watching scary films with her husband.

#BookReview: Pine by Francine Toon @DoubledayUK #Pine #damppebbles

“They are driving home from the search party when they see her. The trees are coarse and tall in the winter light, standing like men.

Lauren and her father Niall live alone in the Highlands, in a small village surrounded by pine forest. When a woman stumbles out onto the road one Halloween night, Niall drives her back to their house in his pickup. In the morning, she’s gone.

In a community where daughters rebel, men quietly rage, and drinking is a means of forgetting, mysteries like these are not out of the ordinary. The trapper found hanging with the dead animals for two weeks. Locked doors and stone circles. The disappearance of Lauren’s mother a decade ago.

Lauren looks for answers in her tarot cards, hoping she might one day be able to read her father’s turbulent mind. Neighbours know more than they let on, but when local teenager Ann-Marie goes missing it’s no longer clear who she can trust.

In the shadow of the Highland forest, Francine Toon captures the wildness of rural childhood and the intensity of small-town claustrophobia. In a place that can feel like the edge of the word, she unites the chill of the modern gothic with the pulse of a thriller. It is the perfect novel for our haunted times.”

Welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to be sharing my review of Pine by Francine Toon. Pine was published by Doubleday in all formats on 1st October 2020. I chose to read and review a free ARC of Pine but that has in no way influenced my review.

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past year (and let’s face it, for many of us that would probably have been preferable!) then chances are you’ve seen Pine mentioned before. It’s a huge book. A prize-winning novel, shortlisted for many prestigious crime fiction awards. And rightly so. I don’t think I’ve ever read anything quite like Pine before.

Lauren and her father are driving home one night when a mysterious, unresponsive figure steps out into the road. They bundle her into their truck, take her home to safety and give her a good meal. In the morning, the woman has gone. But only Lauren can remember what happened the night before. Odd occurrences like this aren’t all that unusual in the small town on the outskirts of the pine forest in the Scottish highlands though. Strange things sometimes happen, people go missing without a trace…

I really felt for Lauren who is such a beautifully written character. Her innocence and her maturity broke my heart in equal measure. She really got under my skin and I was repeatedly drawn back to the book to see what was going to happen next. I willed for her to have a happy ending. You’ll have to pick up a copy of the book yourself to see if she does.

For a debut, this is quite an astonishing book. The prose is stunning and the setting is creepy and atmospheric, almost haunting. I would go as far as saying it is a character in it’s own right. There’s a supernatural feel to Pine which had me on the edge of my seat. The author sprinkles unease over her story from start to finish and I loved how the building sense of the unknown drew me into the pages. I was hooked and with Lauren every step of the way.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. Pine is a beautiful slow-burn gothic mystery. I’m a huge fan of claustrophobic small town settings and Toon has achieved something great here. It’s haunting and suspenseful, eerie and compelling. A tale of fractured relationships, grief and addiction. Of lives destroyed and of lives with just nowhere to go. As I said earlier, I’ve not read anything like this before and I don’t expect to read anything like it again. Recommended.

I chose to read and review a free ARC of Pine. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

Pine by Francine Toon was published in the UK by Doubleday on 1st October 2020 and is available in hardcover, paperback, audio and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.ukWaterstonesFoylesBook DepositoryBookshop.orgthe damppebbles bookshop.org shop |

Francine Toon grew up in Sutherland and Fife, Scotland. Her poetry, written as Francine Elena, has appeared in The Sunday Times, The Best British Poetry 2013 and 2015 anthologies (Salt) and Poetry London, among other places. Pine was longlisted for the Deborah Rogers Foundation Writers Award. She lives in London and works in publishing.

#BlogTour | #GuestReview: Subterfuge (A Tom Stone Detective Story #5) by Don Simkovich and Lon Casler Bixby (@DonSimkovich @LonBixby) @cobaltdinosaur #Subterfuge #damppebbles

“A wounded man, fiberglass wreckage, and mysterious blue barrels wash up on a secluded beach north of Los Angeles in Malibu, California.

Detective Tom Stone jumps into action in this gripping thriller novel and uncovers human trafficking as drug smugglers try a new trick.

The Ojos Negros cartel forms an uneasy alliance with LA mob boss Frank DeVito. Using hidden sea caves as drop-off points, the new syndicate maneuvers to expand their brutal drug empire, and guns down anyone who stands in their way.

Stone and his team trail the lone survivor, Luis Delgado, who longs to return home to Mexico but is trapped in a deadly game of subterfuge. He vows revenge on the evil men who have destroyed his life and countless others with their greed.

The Detectives race to find Delgado and bring down the cartel, before another innocent victim is killed.

Uncover narco-subs plying the seas with page-turning action—and hold on for an explosive ending.”

Hello and welcome to damppebbles! Today I’ve handed the keys to the blog over to my guest reviewer, Ryan, who is going to share his thoughts on the fifth Tom Stone Detective Story – Subterfuge. Subterfuge was published on 6th November 2020 and is available in paperback and digital formats. Ryan chose to read and review a free digital copy of Subterfuge but that has in no way influenced his review.

Subterfuge is the first novel I have read by the team of Simkovich and Casler Bixby. It’s an intriguing story of smugglers, mafia style gangs and the police trying to stop them. When two cartels collide there is always friction and the creaky alliance made between the leader known as ‘Rabbit’ and De Vito’s gang stops this being the classic Cops vs Gangs, adding a third dimension for alliances and treachery.

One aspect of Subterfuge that shone through was the character of Luis Delgado. Delgado is the lone survivor from a failed drugs run. His life has been destroyed and he’s scared of going home in case the cartels find him. He becomes the unpredictable element in a story filled with drama. Casler Bixby and Simkovich have written a story that can be seen from 4 sides. The Cops (Stone and Sharpe) are a good pairing. Determined to get results even if it means using some friends in low places. De Vito’s cartel is a scary place to live – “serve well or die quickly” appears to be the unofficial motto. De Vito’s empire is growing with just one thorn in his side – the Ojo Negros Cartel. So when Rabbit from the Ojo Negros walks into De Vito’s stronghold and declares a partnership an uneasy truce starts to take place. The fourth and final view is from Delgado who finds himself in the middle of a situation he could never have imagined. A twisted character torn between revenge, staying alive and justice – which way will he turn?

Every time I opened this book I was desperate to see whether the characters would survive. Who would be gaining the upper hand and who would be taking a one way ticket on the next submarine smuggling drugs across the oceans. The authors do a wonderful job of making the readers feel empathy for some of the victims of the cartels. You want to protect them, you want them to win out, but you know they are up against all the odds and the chances of them being double crossed are high. The authors keep the action high throughout the book, luring the reader on for one more page in expert fashion.

Subterfuge is a recommended read for anyone looking for a thriller with plenty of action and strong characters. It will pull you in and keep you riveted until the final page. I’m sure there is more to come from the authors and I will be keeping my eyes peeled.

I chose to read and review a free copy of Subterfuge. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

Subterfuge by Don Simkovich & Lon Casler Bixby was published in the UK by Carved in Stone Media on 6th November 2020 and is available in paperback and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.uk | amazon.com | the damppebbles bookshop.org shop | Goodreads |

Don returned to his love for writing fiction after years of writing and narrating a radio spot series, marketing copy, and handling the pressures of a wild and crazy family life.

Frequent calls to the local Sheriff’s office, plus the intensity of handling teen alcoholism and teen pregnancy pressed stories from his mind like Earth’s weighty layers turn shale into harvestable fuel.

Well, you get the picture.

Don has fine-tuned his craft writing romance to crime fiction and the recent Tom Stone detective stories.

He lives at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains with his family, two dogs, and anyone else who happens to drop by and live for a spell.

Lon is a published author in various genres: Fiction, Poetry, Humor, Photography, and Comic Books. He is also a professional award-winning photographer whose work has been featured in a wide variety of magazines, art & coffee table books, and has also been displayed in Art Galleries throughout the world.

Lon lives out of his photography studio in Burbank, California where he shares his living space with his wonderful, albeit spoiled, Silver Lab named Silver.

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #Author Joy Kluver (@JoyKluver) #JoyKluver #DIBernadetteNoel #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Hello. How the heck are you? It’s been a few days since we last spoke. If you celebrated, how was your Christmas? I hope, despite it not being quite what many of us initially planned, it was a good one and you received bookish delights galore. Today marks day 53 of #R3COMM3ND3D2020 and the FINAL post of the 2020 season. It’s been a tough old year for many of us but the books have been outstanding and helped many of us escape what’s been going on around us. I have loved sharing your #R3COMM3ND3D2020 picks since 1st November more than ever. Thank you to everyone who has liked, shared, retweeted and commented on the posts. You make #R3COMM3ND3D something very special. But the show’s not over just yet…

Today I am thrilled to welcome a brilliant blogger and soon-to-be debut author to share three of their favourite books published this year. It’s the fabulous Joy Kluver who shares her love of (mostly) crime fiction over at Joy Kluver. It’s Joy’s birthday today so I would like to take this opportunity to wish her a very happy birthday 🥳. I hope you have a lovely day. Joy is also on the brink of publishing her debut novel with Bookouture in February next year so keep an eye out for the first book in the DI Bernadette Noel series. Personally, I can’t wait to read it and it’s high on my most eagerly anticipated books of 2021 list.

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are the three books Joy chose…

The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elisabeth Gifford
The Lost Lights of St Kilda is a sweeping love story that will cross oceans and decades. It is a moving and deeply vivid portrait of two lovers, a desolate island, and the extraordinary power of hope in the face of darkness.
Joy’s Review of The Lost Lights of St Kilda

Body Language by A. K. Turner
Novels set in mortuaries have been around for quite a while but there’s a new girl in town and her name is Cassie Raven. With dyed black hair, piercings and tattoos, she’s not your average mortuary technician. And thank goodness for that. A.K. Turner has breathed fresh life into a setting that has to remain within the rules of science.
Joy’s Review of Body Language

We Begin at the End by Chris Whitaker
This is my book of the year. Chris Whitaker immerses us in the lives of Duchess Day Radley and her younger brother, Robin. Aged 13 and 5 respectively at the beginning of the story, their lot in life is pretty bad. It’s an epic tale of revenge and redemption. The writing is utterly sublime and quite honestly, it’s not just my book of the year but one of the best books I’ve ever read.
Joy’s Review of We Begin at the End

Brilliant choices, thanks so much Joy. I am absolutely over the moon to see We Begin at the End on your list as that makes it the clear winner of #R3COMM3ND3D2020 with FIVE votes. Huge congratulations to Chris Whitaker and the team at Zaffre Books. A very worthy winner as, and I don’t know if I’ve mentioned this before, it’s my book of the year without a shadow of a doubt (😉).

If Joy has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elisabeth Gifford
Body Language by A.K. Turner
We Begin at the End by Chris Whitaker

About Joy Kluver:
I’m a blogger and soon to be published author! My debut novel featuring DI Bernadette Noel will be published by Bookouture in February 2021. But I’ll still be sharing the book love on my blog.

Joy’s Blog and Social Media Links:
| Joy Kluver | Twitter @JoyKluver | Facebook |

That’s all folks! Well, for #R3COMM3ND3D2020 anyway. I’m off to write my ‘books of the year’ post now which I may or may not get whittled down in time to post before the end of 2020 😜. If I don’t, I hope you have a very happy New Year. Thank you for your support over the last twelve months. It means the world to me. You are AMAZING!

Don’t forget to start making a list of those 2021 releases as #R3COMM3ND3D will return towards the end of next year. It might not be exactly the same as the last few years – not sure in what way yet – but it will return in one form or another. Stay safe, stay bookish and keep reading. Love ya!

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #Author Terry Tyler (@TerryTyler4) #TheVisitor #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Hello and welcome to damppebbles. It’s the final day of #R3COMM3ND3D2020 before Christmas and what a treat I have in store for you. Before I introduce today’s guest though I wanted to take this opportunity to wish you a wonderful Christmas if you’re celebrating over the next week.

Today I am delighted to welcome author Terry Tyler to share three of her favourite books published this year. Terry’s most recent release – The Visitor – was chosen only last week by Sue at Sue’s Musings and is a compelling post-apocalyptic murder mystery set in a pandemic. Sign me up, sounds like my kind of book!

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are the three books Terry has chosen…

The End of the Road by Anna Legat
This is my favourite sort of post apocalyptic story – shocking and bleak, and all about the characters. Each one is a story in itself.
Terry’s Review of The End of the Road

Nest of Ashes by G. Lawrence
I’m Tudor addicted, and Gemma Lawrence’s fictional accounts of the wives of Henry VIII are the best I’ve read. I can’t wait for Book 2!
Terry’s Review of Nest of Ashes

Plumas de Muerte: Tequila Journals and Dreams by Phil Motel
A memoir about a time when the author was living in a motel, working at a tedious desk job and drinking far too much. It’s real life, warts and all. One of those writers who can make the mundane fascinating to read.
Terry’s Review of Plumas de Muerte: Tequila Journals and Dreams by Phil Motel

Three really interesting choices and a few additions to the terrifying TBR. Thanks so much, Terry.

If Terry has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

The End of the Road by Anna Legat
Nest of Ashes by G. Lawrence
Plumas de Muerte: Tequila Journals and Dreams by Phil Motel

About The Visitor:
In 2024, a mystery virus ravages the entire world. ‘Bat Fever’ is highly contagious and one hundred per cent lethal.

A cottage tucked away in an isolated Norfolk village seems like the ideal place to sit out a catastrophic pandemic, but some residents of Hincham resent the arrival of Jack, Sarah and their friends, while others want to know too much about them.

What the villagers don’t know is that beneath Sarah’s cottage is a fully-stocked, luxury survival bunker. A post-apocalyptic ‘des res’.

Hincham isolates itself from the rest of the country, but the deaths continue―and not from the virus. There’s a killer on the loose, but is it a member of the much-depleted community, or somebody from outside? Paranoia is rife, as friend suspects friend, and everybody suspects the newcomers.

Most terrifying of all is that nobody knows who’s next on the list…

The Visitor is Terry Tyler’s twenty-second Amazon publication, and is set in the same world as her Project Renova series, while being a completely separate, stand-alone novel.

amazon.co.ukamazon.comGoodreads |

About Terry Tyler:
Terry Tyler is the author of twenty-two books available from Amazon, the latest being The Visitor, a post-apocalyptic murder mystery set in the same world as her popular Project Renova series. She is a member of Rosie Amber’s Book Review Team, and likes to read historical fiction (12th-16th century), fiction about the collapse of society and bleak dystopian futures, and non-fiction based on travel, sociological and anthropological subject matter.

Terry enjoys a TV binge – she is a Walking Dead obsessive, and also likes South Park, political/historical/crime documentaries, crime thrillers, and series that feature Travis Fimmel and Jason Momoa striding across barren landscapes. She lives with her husband in the North East of England.

Terry’s Blog and Social Media Links:
Terry Tyler Book Reviews | Twitter @TerryTyler4 |

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 is now closed. Fifty-four brilliant book bloggers and authors have shared three of their favourite 2020 books with us (I have one more post left to share on 29th December). I hope you’ve found a book (or five!) to add to your TBR. #R3COMM3ND3D will return next year in the form of #R3COMM3ND3D2021 so start making a note of any cracking 2021 releases now and keep an eye out for the sign-up form from June onwards. Thank so much to everyone who has taken part, shared, retweeted and generally supported the feature. YOU make it something special ❤️

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #BookBlogger Julie Morris (@book_problem) #ALittleBookProblem #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Hello bookish friends and welcome to a brand new week on damppebbles. It’s day 51 of #R3COMM3ND3D2020 and I’m sad to say that we’re nearing the end of this year’s feature. But what a blast it’s been! If you’re an author or a book blogger and would like to shout about three books published in 2020 which you love then fear not, there’s still a smidge of time left to do it. I have a mere four spaces left so if you fancy taking part, pop your details and your books on the form at the end of this post.

Today I am delighted to welcome another fabulous book blogger to share the book love. Joining me on this wintry Monday is the fantastic Julie of A Little Book Problem. Julie’s blog is absolutely superb and I can’t recommend it highly enough. Head on over and give her a follow if you don’t already. You won’t regret it, I promise!

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are Julie’s three #R3COMM3ND3D2020 picks…

Fake Law: The Truth About Justice in an Age of Lies by The Secret Barrister
I’ve gone with two non-fiction titles this year. For me, it has been a year of increased non-fiction reading, I think I’m trying to make sense of a nonsensical world. As an ex-lawyer, I know how important the law is to the daily lives of everyone, and it frustrates me how little understanding many people have of the law and how it protects them, and how much nonsense and fake news floats around that people take as gospel. This book seeks to address some of those myths, and inform people of why the law is important, and it does it brilliantly. It is my book of the year.
Julie’s Review of Fake Law

Hinton Hollow Death Trip by Will Carver
This book just blew me away with its originality. I sometimes wish I could have a peek in Will Carver’s mind and see how his brain works because he comes up with ideas no one else would ever dream up. Every one of his books is unique, and he outdid himself with this one. Narrated by Evil itself, its one of those book you never forget once you’ve read it. Orenda has fast become my favourite publisher, because of output like this.
Julie’s Review of Hinton Hollow Death Trip

More Than a Woman by Caitlin Moran
Another non-fiction title, this one a must read for every forty-something woman who wants to feel understood. This book made me laugh and cry, quite a feat for a non-fiction title. Like having a slightly drunken conversation about life with that friend you’ve known forever. I’d like to give a copy to every middle-aged woman I’ve ever met and say, ‘See, you ARE normal!’
Julie’s Review of More Than a Woman

Three fantastic choices, thank you Julie. This is the second time we’ve seen Hinton Hollow Death Trip by Will Carver which puts it in joint third place along with She Lies Close by Sharon Doering, The Secrets of Strangers by Charity Norman, The Miseducation of Evie Epworth by Matson Taylor and Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton.

If Julie has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

Fake Law: The Truth About Justice in an Age of Lies by The Secret Barrister
Hinton Hollow Death Trip by Will Carver
More Than a Woman by Caitlin Moran

About Julie:
Julie has been blogging at A Little Book Problem for four years. She hosts three popular guest features on her blog, as well as reviewing books and rambling about various un-bookish matters. She was recently named the Romantic Novelists’ Association’s Media Star for 2020.

Julie’s Blog and Social Media Links:
A Little Book ProblemTwitter @book_problemFacebookInstagram @alittlebookproblem |

If you’re a book blogger, bookstagrammer or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/kHTQeQdiUNZTsW4d6)

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #BookBlogger Anne Williams (@Williams13Anne) #BeingAnne #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Hello and welcome to Sunday on damppebbles! I hope you have a good book on the go this weekend. It’s day FIFTY of #R3COMM3ND3D2020 and today I am absolutely delighted to welcome a bookish gem to share their three #R3COMM3ND3D picks with us. It’s the fabulous, award-winning Anne of Being Anne. Anne is one of the loveliest people you could meet and an absolute superstar. If you don’t already subscribe to Anne’s posts, then make sure that changes!

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are the three books Anne has chosen…

Wild Spinning Girls by Carol Lovekin
A book filled with magic, and not only because of the sublime writing – and the characters are stunning. I loved this book – there’s a delicious darkness about it, but also a lightness that makes your heart sing, with a final note of hope that will long remain. Stunning.
Anne’s Review of Wild Spinning Girls

The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elisabeth Gifford
A quite remarkable dual timeline story, beautifully written: one of its threads, perhaps the most dominant one, focuses on the community eking out a living on the island of St Kilda. The descriptions of the natural world and the impact of the seasons are exceptional – and it’s also a stunning and moving love story. Quite unforgettable.
Anne’s Review of The Lost Lights of St Kilda

The Memory by Judith Barrow
This could have been a really difficult read with its focus on that emotional maelstrom that dementia brings – further complicated by the way the characters’ lives have unfolded, with a single significant memory driving an ever-present hatred that underpins the story. The way it’s structured is absolute perfection, one timeline focused on a slow-moving 24 hours, the other following all the memories. Powerful and compelling, a story superbly told, and an entirely unforgettable emotional experience.
Anne’s Review of The Memory

Three absolutely stunning books, thank you Anne. All three of your choices would make beautiful Christmas gifts.

If Anne has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

Wild Spinning Girls by Carol Lovekin
The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elisabeth Gifford
The Memory by Judith Barrow

About Anne:
Anne Williams is a book blogger and reviewer, at Being Anne: the blog is now approaching eight years old. She lives in Wetherby in Yorkshire, and took early retirement six years ago to do everything she enjoys, including reading and reviewing as many books as she possibly can, and indulging herself with exotic holidays. Life changed a little few years ago, when she became carer for her mother: the travel had to stop for a while, but nothing can come between Anne and the reading. Her blog won the Best Pal award at the Annual Bloggers’ Bash for three years running, and she was delighted to win the RNA’s Media Star of the Year award in 2019.

Anne’s Blog and Social Media Links:
| Being Anne | Twitter @Williams13Anne | Facebook |

If you’re a book blogger, bookstagrammer or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/kHTQeQdiUNZTsW4d6)

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #BookBlogger Duncan (@ExoticCrimeFict) #ExoticFictionReader #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Hello bookish friends and welcome to Saturday on damppebbles. How are your Christmas preparations going  if you celebrate? Less than a week to go until the big day and I FINALLY mention Christmas 😂.

One of the things I love most about #R3COMM3ND3D is getting to meet new bloggers. Today I am delighted to welcome another fairly ‘new to me’ blogger to share their three #R3COMM3ND3D2020 picks with us, it’s Duncan of Exotic Fiction Reader. I’m a huge fan of translated crime fiction and I’ve already found some great recommendations over on Duncan’s blog.

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are Duncan’s three #R3COMM3ND3D picks…

The Coral Bride by Roxanne Bouchard
Set in the Gaspé Peninsula in Quebec, translated from the French by David Warriner, this is a rich and absorbing story of a Mexican detective investigating the disappearance of a fisher woman in a remote and tight-lipped community. Family feuds, misplaced loyalty and fabulous landscapes each play their part in a fabulous read.
Duncan’s Review of The Coral Bride

Summer of Reckoning by Marion Brunet
Translated by Karen Gregory, this is the story of two French sisters living in a small town near Avignon. A place where suspicion jealousy, resentment and racial prejudice lead to tragedy. The novel is so striking as Brunet accurately articulates human thought and interaction in all its inconsistencies in such a powerful and realistic way.
Duncan’s Review of Summer of Reckoning

Like Flies From Afar by K. Ferrari
One day in the life of Argentine mobster Luis Machi who discovers an unknown enemy had left him with a unsuspected problem that he urgently needs to dispose of. The prose, translated by Adrian Nathan West, is fast and unrelenting. It’s like a roller-coaster ride in Machi’s two hundred thousand dollar BMW, just don’t check in the boot!
Duncan’s Review of Like Flies From Afar

Thanks so much, Duncan. Three great picks which are going straight on the terrifying TBR!

If Duncan has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

The Coral Bride by Roxanne Bouchard
Summer of Reckoning by Marion Brunet
Like Flies From Afar by K. Ferrari

About Duncan:
A long term reader of fast paced thrillers, I gradually found myself less enthusiastic for predictable storylines and locations. Then I discovered there is another world out there as started to get my crime fix overseas. I am now a keen reader and reviewer in mainly translated crime and some literary fiction from around the world. The more exotic the location, the better, we can travel further in the literature we read.

Duncan’s Blog and Social Media Links:
Exotic Fiction ReaderTwitter @ExoticCrimeFictFacebook GroupBookshop.org |

If you’re a book blogger, bookstagrammer or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/kHTQeQdiUNZTsW4d6)