#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #BookBlogger Jen Lucas (@JenMedBkReviews) #JenMedsBookReviews #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Hello bookish chums and welcome to a new day on the blog and more fabulous #R3COMM3ND3D2020 recommendations. Today I am delighted to be joined by the absolutely brilliant Jen Lucas of Jen Med’s Book Reviews. Jen’s blog is incredibly popular and it’s easy to see why. I’m a huge fan and I heartily recommend you give Jen Med’s Book Reviews a follow. You won’t regret it.

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are the three books Jen recommends…

R3C20 the waiting rooms

The Waiting Rooms by Eve Smith
It may seem a bit perverse to be choosing a book about a world that is paralysed by an antibiotic resistant infection right now, but this book is so much more than that. Part crime thriller, part dissection of our perilous over reliance on antibiotics, Thai book is 100% thrilling and had me completely hooked. It also examines the fragility of our lives, last regrets and the absolute importance of family and is highly recommended by me and many others. Even reading it in the height of the first lockdown, this book felt timely and important.
Jen’s Review of The Waiting Rooms

R3C20 We begin at the end

We Begin at the End by Chris Whitaker
This guy … Chris Whitaker has the amazing ability to write a book that completely takes you out of the present and into his fictional world, not letting go until you are done. Following a small group of people in a small American town whose lives have been torn apart by tragedy, this story looks deep into the heart of love, family, friendship and loyalty. The characters are so memorable, especially The Outlaw Duchess ‘Day’ Radley, I was left bereft when it finished. The story is moving, emotional, occasionally dark and very, very powerful. Just don’t tell Mr Whitaker I said so.
Jen’s Review of We Begin at the End

R3C20 ash mountain

Ash Mountain by Helen Fitzgerald
This is a short but incredibly powerful book. The imagery is stark, following the residents of a small Australian town caught up in a devastating bush fire, the impact is immense. With some tender, poignant and even occasionally funny moments, this book plays with all of your emotions and will leave you breathless by the end. There are some darker times to be read, difficult subjects handled carefully, as well as taking a good look at the subject of family and friendships. My lasting memories of this book? How fragile life can be and poor Ronnie Corbett.
Jen’s Review of Ash Mountain

Thanks so much for your brilliant choices, Jen. I’m particularly pleased to see We Begin at the End on your list as it’s my book of the year, without a shadow of a doubt. It’s now also in the lead along with She Lies Close by Sharon Doering, The Secrets of Strangers by Charity Norman and The Miseducation of Evie Epworth by Matson Taylor. I’m a little bit giddy. One of these four books could be our #R3COMM3ND3D2020 winner!

If Jen has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

The Waiting Rooms by Eve Smith
We Begin at the End by Chris Whitaker
Ash Mountain by Helen Fitzgerald

About Jen Lucas:
Full time Contract Officer and part time moderately functioning book blogger I read to keep me sane. I live in a beautifully rural part of the country which means I have few distractions from my reading, other than going for lovely long walks.

If I’m not working, I’m generally reading. I a degree in American Studies and Literature but barely picked up a book in the fifteen or so years after graduating so have spent the past six or seven years making up for lost time (yes I’m that old). I love a good book and I love a good book recommendation.

Jen’s Blog and Social Media Links:
| Jen Med’s Book Reviews | Twitter @JenMedBkReviews | Facebook | Instagram @jenmedsbookreviews | Instagram @ramblingreviewer |

If you’re a book blogger, bookstagrammer or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/kHTQeQdiUNZTsW4d6)

#BookReview: The Last by Hanna Jameson #TheLast #damppebbles

the last“THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT HAS ENDED

You and nineteen other survivors hole up in an isolated Swiss hotel.

You wait, you survive.

Then you find the body.

One of your number has blood on their hands.

The race is on to find the killer…BEFORE THE KILLER FINDS YOU.”

Hello and a very warm welcome to damppebbles. Today I am delighted to share my review of The Last by Hanna Jameson with you. The Last was published by Penguin Books on 1st August 2019 and is available in all formats. I received a free ARC of The Last but that has in no way influenced my review.

I do love me a post-apocalyptic thriller! But I know what I like and conversely, what I don’t like. I read a book earlier this year which claimed to be a dystopian thriller. It was a whole lot of thriller and not a lot of dystopian. I wanted to find out how the characters coped with their ‘new normal’. I wanted to see conflict, fear and adjustment to the setting and the new ways of life. So I was a little apprehensive starting The Last. Would this book be much of the same? I’m delighted to confirm that The Last is far superior to the book I read earlier this year as Jameson puts her characters, their experience and their adjustment to the new ways, front and centre.

Historian Jon Keller is at a conference in a Swiss hotel when the bombs hit. It’s everyone’s worst nightmare come terrifyingly true. The nuclear bombs wipe out large proportions of the US, where Jon calls home, along with a large proportion of Europe. Thankfully Switzerland seems largely unaffected but who knows what kind of state the world is outside the hotel doors. The original number staying at the hotel has dwindled leaving twenty guests to come to terms with what has happened to them and forge a new life within the walls of L’Hotel Sixième. Roles have been redefined, the work is tough and everyone has to adjust to the new way of living. While investigating a problem with the water supply, Jon discovers a body in the water tank. The stark truth of the matter becomes worryingly clear. Within this small community, where they’ve come to depend on each other so much, one of them is a killer….

Now I know I referred to The Last as a post-apocalyptic thriller earlier in this review but it’s not really a thriller. It’s a well-written, slow build character study of people put in the worst scenario imaginable. The reader gets to watch as they struggle to survive, let alone cope with their new world from the comfort of their armchair. But, it’s a little too close to the knuckle in some respects and feels plausibly real. The mystery aspect of the story isn’t really the main crux of the book either but it’s an interesting storyline which gives Jon something to obsess over. And obsess over it he does. The mystery into who killed the girl almost completely consumes him.

I found Jameson’s characters really interesting to read about. Although I struggled to like any of them. But I’m not sure that’s necessarily what the author wants her readers to feel anyway. They’re all individuals coping the best way they can. Yes, they’re selfish, suspicious and on edge but that just added to my enjoyment of the book. The claustrophobic feel of the situation was absolutely marvellous and I thoroughly enjoyed the group’s plight (turns out I’m a horrible person taking enjoyment in others misfortune, good job they’re fictional characters really!).

The ending of this book threw me a little. I was expecting something big and bold but I didn’t get it. I felt the ending let the book down a little. The reader travels so far with these characters, you get to know them even if you don’t like them, and then…well – I won’t say anymore because I don’t want to spoil the book for other readers but I was a little disappointed.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. If you like your novels character-driven then absolutely, The Last is a book you should read. I enjoyed the post-apocalyptic elements. I wanted them to go out exploring what was left of Switzerland and they did exactly that, with trepidation and caution. Some of their encounters were nail-biting and I loved the unease and tension in these sections away from the hotel. As I said previously, there was just enough of this strange new world to satisfy me. All in all, an intriguing premise that hooked me from the start. Recommended.

I chose to read and review a free ARC of The Last. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

The Last by Hanna Jameson was published in the UK by Penguin Books on 1st August 2019 and is available in hardcover, paperback, audio and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.uk | Waterstones | Foyles | Book Depository | Goodreads |

Hanna Jameson’s fourth novel, part murder mystery and part post-apocalyptic thriller – THE LAST – is out now with Viking in the UK and Simon & Schuster-Atria Books in the US. The Last is the story of an American academic searching for the truth about a girl who has been murdered in his Swiss hotel in the aftermath of a nuclear war that has destroyed most of the Western world.

Jameson had written the first draft of her debut, award-nominated novel – SOMETHING YOU ARE – at just seventeen. Something You Are and two further novels in the series – GIRL SEVEN and ROAD KILL – are available now in the UK, Germany, Japan, and the Netherlands.

She lives in London currently, working on screenwriting projects. She likes whiskey, history, and emotionally taxing TV shows.

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #BookBlogger Namrata Ganti (@redpillows91) #redpillows #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Welcome bookish friends to damppebbles. Happy Wednesday. The weekend is almost in sight! Today I am delighted to welcome another brilliant book blogger (I have to ask, where are all the authors this year? Bloggers are smashing it!). It’s the lovely Namrata of redpillows. Namrata’s blog is fantastic so if you don’t already subscribe, head on over there in a tick and correct that.

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are the three books Namrata chose…

R3C20 a heart so fierce and broken

A Heart So Fierce and Broken (Cursebreakers #2) by Brigid Kemmerer
Brigid Kemmerer brings to us a well-written, action-packed sequel that follows Grey’s journey as he deals with the truth about who he is. The author weaves together a rather complicated set of emotions spread among all the characters, all layered one on top of the other. To get to them, we have to peel back each layer and deal with what is revealed. This story is a wonderful sequel to the first, showing us a different aspect of the plot and story and culminating in a cliff hanger, leaving the reader wanting for more! I am sure that every cursebreaker is impatiently waiting for the next book to know what happens!
Namrata’s Review of A Heart So Fierce and Broken

R3C20 who threw draco down the chimney

Who Threw Draco Down the Chimney? (Darya Nandkarni’s Misadventures #3) by Smita Bhattacharya
This is the third book in the series based on the eccentric character of Darya Nandkarni. Darya is a an accidental and amateur detective who seems to find her way towards mysteries or do they find her? That is a question for the reader to ponder!

Who Threw Draco Down the Chimney? is a very well-crafted mystery filled with the right amount of intrigue in a wonderful setting. Smita introduces the reader to the town of Sibiu in Romania. It is easy to imagine the town even without visiting it thanks to the detailed descriptions and precise explanations of the setting, the people, their mannerisms and lives! She paints a wonderful picture that draws the reader in and would even make the reader want to visit and explore this place!

This is a must read for everyone who enjoys mysteries set in unique places and with wonderful twists and turns!
Namrata’s Review of Who Threw Draco Down the Chimney

R3C20 337

337 by M. Jonathan Lee
This latest book by the author is a pleasure to read and though it raises many questions that ensure the reader is kept engaged long after finishing the book. A wonderfully written novel, the story follows Sam as he goes through the motions of living every day. However, not everything is at it seems, and this is a constant theme running in the background of the plot. This book is a must read!
Namrata’s Review of 337

Three great choices, thanks Namrata. The cover and title of A Heart So Fierce and Broken has really captured my attention. I can’t stop looking at the book!

If Namrata has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

A Heart So Fierce and Broken by Brigid Kemmerer
Who Threw Draco Down the Chimney by Smita Bhattacharya
337 by M. Jonathan Lee

About Namrata:
I have enjoyed reading and talking about books since childhood. This love for books led me to start my book review blog seven years ago! I enjoy talking to people about books and even promoting them. I have never been happier than when I have a book in hand!

Namrata’s Blog and Social Media Links:
| redpillows | Twitter @redpillows91 |

If you’re a book blogger, bookstagrammer or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/kHTQeQdiUNZTsW4d6)

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #BookBlogger Janet – LoveBooksReadBooks (@LBRBsBlogs) #LoveBooksReadBooks #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Woohoo, we’ve made it to December! What a month November was with so many brilliant book recommendations. My TBR is now bulging at the seams! Today marks day 31 of #R3COMM3ND3D2020 and joining me today is another brilliant book blogger. It’s Janet from LoveBooksReadBooks. I love Janet’s blog so if you’re not already following her, make sure you change that right now!

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Let’s find out which three books from 2020 Janet recommends…

R3C20 Mexico Street

Mexico Street (Chastity Riley #3) by Simon Buchholz trans. Rachel Ward
First book of the year and it was a riveting read, captivating and enthralling to the end.
Janet’s Review of Mexico Street

R3C20 Paper sparrows

Paper Sparrows by Nathalie Abi-Ezzi
Paper Sparrows is a wonderful book.
Janet’s Review of Paper Sparrows

R3C20 little doubt

Little Doubt (Detective Kelly Porter #7) by Rachel Lynch
The latest in the excellent D I Kelly Porter series has, perhaps, more sociopolitical commentary in this storyline but it certainly is a very good police procedural and a great read.
Janet’s Review of Little Doubt

Three great choices, thank you Janet. I loved the first book in the Chastity Riley series so I need to get a wriggle on and catch up!

If Janet has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

Mexico Street by Simone Buchholz
Paper Sparrows by Nathalie Abi-Ezzi
Little Doubt by Rachel Lynch

About Janet:
I read books, blog about books, love books!

Janet’s Blog and Social Media Links:
| LoveBooksReadBooks | Twitter @LBRBsBlogs |

If you’re a book blogger, bookstagrammer or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/kHTQeQdiUNZTsW4d6)

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #BookBlogger Lynne LeGrow (@fictionophile) #Fictionophile #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Hello and welcome to a new week of #R3COMM3ND3D2020. We’re just past the halfway point (providing I can fill all 57 places – a handful are still available if you would like to take part!) so I wanted to share some interesting #R3COMM3ND3D2020 facts with you. So far (before I reveal today’s blogger and their three picks) 84 (EIGHTY-FOUR!!) brilliant books have been recommended. I’m afraid that’s it for interesting facts today 😂. If I were my husband I would have spreadsheets and pie charts to share too, but I’m not so I’m afraid you’ll have to make do with my one interesting fact for now 🤣.

I am delighted to welcome one of my favourite bloggers to share the book love with us today, it’s the fabulous Lynne of Fictionophile. Lynne’s blog is hugely popular and it’s clear to see why. If you don’t already follow Lynne then I recommend that you change that! She’s a bookish gem and an asset to the community.

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are the three books Lynne chose…

R3C20 all in her head

All In Her Head by Nikki Smith
This debut thriller is a mesmerizing page-turner which deftly portrayed mental illness and a tortured soul with clarity that was only too real. The ending was chilling and assured that I will read more by this talented author.
Lynne’s Review of All In Her Head

R3C20 the creak on the stairs

The Creak on the Stairs by Eva Björg Ægisdóttir
The murder investigation was a slow burn. Multi-layered, it exposed secrets, shame, and egocentricity. A small town mystery with myriad ties to past sins. With themes of grief, loss, child abuse, and more, this story was well written and compelling with some secrets exposed near the end. The ending was both satisfying and poignant in equal measure.
Icelandic noir at its very finest!
Lynne’s Review of The Creak on the Stairs

R3C20 the sea gate

The Sea Gate by Jane Johnson
A dual timeline saga featuring two women who were both strong and resilient. They had many things in common despite their sixty+ year age difference.
The story set during the war years was vividly rendered and well researched. The present day story was also quite compelling, including themes of family secrets, blackmail, and elder abuse.
The ending wrapped up the book perfectly. Poignant and hopeful in equal measure.
Loved it! Every minute of it!
Lynne’s Review of The Sea Gate

Three great choices, thanks Lynne. I think there are a couple of additions to the wish list there too!

If Lynne has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

All In Her Head by Nikki Smith
The Creak on the Stairs by Eva Björg Ægisdóttir
The Sea Gate by Jane Johnson

About Lynne:
I started my book blog to share my love of reading with others, and to document my own reading. I am a retired public library cataloguer, so blogging about books is a way of staying in touch with my bookish passions.
When not reading or blogging I enjoy the company of family and friends, gardening, red wine, and playing with my baby grandson.

Lynne’s Blog and Social Media Links:
| Fictionophile | Twitter @fictionophile | Instagram @fictionophile56 |

If you’re a book blogger, bookstagrammer or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/kHTQeQdiUNZTsW4d6)

Three Days and a Life by Pierre Lemaitre translated by Frank Wynne @maclehosepress #ThreeDaysandaLife #damppebbles

three days and a life“Antoine is twelve years old. His parents are divorced and he lives with his mother in Beauval, a small, backwater town surrounded by forests, where everyone knows everyone’s business, and nothing much ever happens. But in the last days of 1999, a series of events unfolds, culminating in the shocking vanishing without trace of a young child. The adults of the town are at a loss to explain the disappearance, but for Antoine, it all begins with the violent death of his neighbour’s dog. From that one brutal act, his fate and the fate of his neighbour’s six year old son are bound forever.

In the years following Rémi’s disappearance, Antoine wrestles with the role his actions played. As a seemingly inescapable net begins to tighten, breaking free from the suffocating environs of Beauval becomes a gnawing obsession. But how far does he have to run, and how long will it take before his past catches up with him again?

Translated from the French by Frank Wynne”

Hello and a very warm welcome to the blog. I am delighted to be sharing my review of Three Days and a Life by Pierre Lemaitre (translated by Frank Wynne) with you today. Three Days and a Life was published in the UK by Maclehose Press in May 2018 and is available in all formats. I received a free ARC of Three Days and a Life but that has in no way influenced my review.

I have read several of Pierre Lemaitre’s earlier novels and loved them. Alex and Blood Wedding come to mind in particular. But I have also read Irène and Camille which are part of The Paris Crime Files trilogy along with Alex, featuring Commandant Camille Verhœven. They are excellent books and I heartily recommend them all. I’m a huge fan of translated crime fiction so this author and his books tend to be on my go-to list of authors. Saying that, I’ve had Three Days and a Life sat on my shelf for a little while which is strange as it was one of the books I was most excited about when I received it in a goodie bag.

Antoine is a fairly ordinary 12-year-old boy living a fairly ordinary life in a small French town. One fateful day his life takes a dramatic turn and he ends up as part of the most interesting event to have happened in Beauval, the disappearance of 6-year-old Rémi Desmedt. Crowds of people converge to find the boy, teams go out searching day and night but no trace of Rémi is found. Speculation is rife, rumours spread but no one seems to know where Rémi is. No one apart from Antoine…

Three Days and a Life is a slow and intricate unravelling of a well-drawn individual which I found to be highly compelling reading. This is not a novel full of twists and turns and that made me love it just that little bit more. Three Days and a Life shines a spotlight on a character I started out feeling a great deal of sympathy for. Then gradually through the years, the pressure of past events, of secrets hidden, begin to mould and shape the young boy into a rather frustrating young man.

The majority of this book is set over the three days of Rémi’s disappearance. But the tendrils – the secrets and lies – of those fateful days reach far into the future and that’s what I found so appealing about this novel. Antoine is forever looking over his shoulder, waiting for news, waiting to be discovered. The unease and the dread the character feels is palpable. As he matures, his need to escape the small town of Beauval becomes almost obsessive but those tendrils keep digging in, pulling him back.

Would I recommend this book? I would, yes. Three Days and a Life is a compelling character study which I absolutely flew through. A suffocating and claustrophobic piece of well-written fiction. I found Antoine to be such an interesting character and felt I was there with him every step of the way. Elegantly written and beautifully subtle in its tone, you’ll struggle to put this one down once you pick it up. Recommended.

I chose to read and review an ARC of Three Days and a Life. The above review is my own unbiased opinion.

Three Days and a Life by Pierre Lemaitre (translated by Frank Wynne) was published in the UK by Maclehose Press on 3rd May 2018 and is available in hardcover, paperback, audio and digital formats (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.uk | Waterstones | Foyles | Book Depository | Goodreads |

about-the-author3

pierre lemaitrePierre Lemaitre is a French novelist and screenwriter.

Awards: Prix du premier roman du Festival de Cognac 2006 pour Travail soigné – Prix Le Point du polar européen pour Cadres Noirs – Meilleur polar francophone 2009 au Salon de Montigny pour Robe de marié

32877

Frank Wynne was born in 1962 and grew up in Strandhill, Co. Sligo. His father – with T R Henn and others – was among the founding members of the Yeats Summer School in Sligo in 1959, and was President of the school until his death. Through the Summer School, Wynne was introduced to literary figures (whose lectures he recorded with a tape recorder), among them Richard Ellmann and Seamus Heaney

In 1984 he moved to Paris, where he stayed for three years. He moved to London in 1987, at first managing a small French bookshop in Kensington, which sold, among other things, graphic novels. Wynne became involved in the bandes dessinées movement in London and was hired to work on Revolver. From there he moved to Crisis before becoming managing editor of Deadline magazine, home of Tank Girl.

After the demise of Deadline in 1994-5, in part through the badly received film version of Tank Girl, he worked for a time as editorial director of AOL UK.
“I was employee number seven in AOL UK. I went from being the youngest person in every company I had worked for to being the second-oldest person in AOL.”
After he left AOL, he began translating the works of Michel Houellebecq. He now dedicates his time fully to writing and translations.

He describes himself as being of “no fixed abode”, having lived and travelled widely in Central and South America, the Netherlands, Hungary, Turkey, Ireland and the UK.
He has worked as a literary translator for many years translating the novels of Michel Houellebecq. He jointly won the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award with Houellebecq for Atomised, his translation of Les Particules élémentaires. He has subsequently translated Houellebecq’s novels Platform and Lanzarote, together with novels by Pierre Mérot, Frédéric Beigbeder and the late Ivoirian novelist Ahmadou Kourouma.

His translation of Frédéric Beigbeder’s Windows on the World, a novel set in the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York during the September 11, 2001 attacks, won the 2005 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize. He also won the 2008 Scott Moncrieff Translation Prize for his translations of Beigbeder’s Holiday in a Coma and Love Lasts Three Years.

Wynne also translated a number of French bandes dessinées, including graphic novels by Enki Bilal, Lorenzo Mattotti, Max Cabanes and Édika. His first non-fiction book, I Was Vermeer, a biography of Han van Meegeren was published by Bloomsbury in August 2006. Between 1938 and 1944 van Meegeren forged seven paintings, passing them off as lost masterpieces by Vermeer. The works were authenticated by some of the finest art critics in Europe, among them Abraham Bredius, who acclaimed Van Meegeren’s forgery The Supper at Emmaus as “one of – I would go so far as to say * the* masterpiece by Johannes Vermeer of Delft”. Wynne’s biography, I was Vermeer has been serialised as the BBC Radio 4 “Book of the Week” (read by Anton Lesser) for August 7–12, 2006.

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #BookBlogger Rae (@rae_reads1) #Rae Reads #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Hello and welcome to Sunday on damppebbles. I hope you’re managing to have a bookish weekend. Today I am delighted to welcome another wonderful book blogger to share three of their favourite 2020 releases with us. It’s the very lovely Rae of Rae Reads. I’m a huge fan of Rae’s blog so if you don’t already subscribe, that must change! You won’t regret it.

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are Rae’s three #R3COMM3ND3D2020 picks…

R3C20 the nesting

The Nesting by C.J. Cooke
The Nesting was from the very beginning a special kind of story for me. It had a magical charm that captured my imagination along with a paranormal element that was woven in perfectly. The addition of dark folklore dotted throughout was guaranteed to make me love this book even more. At times I found myself smiling away at certain things the characters said or did. Both these lighter and darker moments show how well C. J. Cooke crafted her story into something extremely engaging for the reader.
Rae’s Review of The Nesting

R3C20 the thursday murder club

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman
What a fun story this was! I couldn’t help but grow attached to this group. Even though they may live in a retirement village don’t let that fool you. These friends had lively and clever personalities that shined bright. I love cosy mysteries and The Thursday Murder Club is a brilliant example of one. With plenty of twists, surprises and secrets thrown in to keep me on my toes. There were moments that left me smiling, chuckling and maybe even a few times when I got a little teary. There is something very engaging about this book!
Rae’s Review of The Thursday Murder Club

R3C20 the return of the disappearing duke

The Return of the Disappearing Duke by Lara Temple
As soon as I started reading this book I knew I would love it! Everything worked so well for me. From the setting in Egypt to the characters themselves. The Return of the Disappearing Duke really was the perfect escape. Let’s just say that they go on quite an adventure, one that captured my attention from start to finish. From a memorable first meeting between this pair to their travels across the desert. Their interactions were very entertaining from the playful barbs to the smiles they shared. With plenty of adventure, a hint of danger and a captivating romance The Return of the Disappearing Duke was brilliant!
Rae’s Review of The Return of the Disappearing Duke

Thanks so much for your brilliant picks, Rae. I loved The Thursday Murder Club and I can’t wait for the second book in the series!

If Rae has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

The Nesting by C.J. Cooke
The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman
The Return of the Disappearing Duke by Lara Temple

About Rae:
I’m a mum of two and you can usually catch me reading or blogging about bookish things over on my blog. If I do find any extra time then I’ll probably be baking or knitting (badly) 😂

Rae’s Blog and Social Media Links:
| Rae’s Reads | Twitter @rae_reads1 | Facebook | Instagram @raereads1 |

If you’re a book blogger, bookstagrammer or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/kHTQeQdiUNZTsW4d6)

#CoverReveal: The Girl in the Missing Poster by Barbara Copperthwaite (@BCopperthwait) @bookouture #TheGirlInTheMissingPoster #damppebbles

Hello my bookish lovelies. I hope you’re having a splendid weekend. Allow me to make it a little bit better!

If you were online on Friday around 4pm you may have seen a rather stunning cover be revealed. Sadly, I wasn’t so I couldn’t take part. However, the author – Barbara Copperthwaite – is one of my favourite authors and quite possibly, the loveliest and most encouraging person in the book world. So I wanted to help share the love for her brand new book – which I hope explains why I’m a little late to the cover reveal party.

So, without further ado, let’s find out a little more about the brilliant new novel from the utterly fabulous Barbara Copperthwaite – The Girl in the Missing Poster! Here’s the blurb…

MISSING – Have you seen this girl? Nineteen-year-old Leila Hawkins was last seen on 24 June, 1994, when she left her parents’ anniversary party early and ran into the stormy night wearing her twin sister Stella’s long red coat. She was never seen again.

I wrap my arms around the tree trunk, pressing my cheek against it until the bark digs in and the missing poster is finally secured. I try not to look at the photograph on it. At the features so similar to mine. Perhaps this will be the year someone comes forward.

Were crucial mistakes made by detectives from the very beginning?

Could the pressure of living two lives have led my sister to run away – or even end it?

Or did someone in her tight circle of friends and family have reason to want her gone?

Someone out there must know something.

But the last thing I ever expect is a direct response from the person who took Leila. Wracked with guilt and completely alone in the world without the other half of me, I have no choice but to agree to his strange request: private, intimate details of my life in return for answers.

As the final moments of my sister’s life play out before me, I feel closer to her than I ever dreamed I’d be again. So close, it could almost be happening to me. But when I finally realise who is behind this terrifying tragedy, will I make it out alive?

From the bestselling author of The Perfect Friend, this absolutely gripping psychological thriller will keep you up all night and leave you sleeping with the light on. If you lovedGone Girl, The Girl on the TrainandThe Wife Between Usthis book is for you!

Now doesn’t that sound AMAZING?! I can absolutely guarantee you will be hearing more about this book on damppebbles when it’s released in February. Without a shadow of a doubt.

And now, here’s that gorgeous cover…

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I love it! What an eye-catching cover. I cannot wait to read this book!

The Girl in the Missing Poster by Barbara Copperthwaite will be published in the UK by Bookouture on 23rd February 2021 and is available to pre-order now (please note, the following links are affiliate links which means I receive a small percentage of the purchase price at no extra cost to you): | amazon.co.uk | apple books | kobo |

about-the-author3

j1g1dqoj5e1ufe7m2e3u5htf2f._US230_Barbara is the Amazon, Kobo and USA Today bestselling author of psychological thrillers INVISIBLE, FLOWERS FOR THE DEAD, THE DARKEST LIES, HER LAST SECRET and THE PERFECT FRIEND. She has a new book coming soon!

Her writing career started in journalism, writing for national newspapers and magazines. During a career spanning over twenty years Barbara interviewed the real victims of crime – and also those who have carried those crimes out. She is fascinated by creating realistic, complex characters, and taking them apart before the readers’ eyes in order to discover just how much it takes to push a person over a line.

Her first book, Invisible, was ‘totally gripping, and scarily believable’ according to Bella magazine. Its success was followed by Flowers For The Dead, which was the Sunday Mirror’s Choice Read, beating Lee Child’s latest offering. ‘Will have you looking over your shoulder and under your bed… Original, gripping, with a deep psychological impact,’ their review read.

The Darkest Lies came next, published by Bookouture, and became a USA Today bestseller. The follow-up, Her Last Secret, hit the Number 1 spot on Kobo. The Perfect Friend is a No 1 Kobo and Amazon best seller.

When not writing feverishly at her home in Birmingham, Barbara is often found walking her two dogs, Scamp and Buddy, or hiding behind a camera to take wildlife photographs.

To find out more about Barbara’s novels, go to:
Website: http://www.barbaracopperthwaite.com
Blog: http://www.barbaracopperthwaite.wordpress.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AuthorBarbaraCopperthwaite
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/BCopperthwait
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/barbaracopperthwa

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #BookBlogger Jen Thomason (@jenthomason1109) #DandelionsInspired #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Hello and happy weekend! I hope you have lots of bookish plans in store for the next two days. It’s day 28 of #R3COMM3ND3D2020 and today I am delighted to welcome another brilliant book blogger to share the #R3COMM3ND3D book love and help increase our tottering TBRs. It’s the very lovely Jen of Dandelions Inspired. I think, if memory serves, that Jen’s blog was one of the first blogs I followed when I first started damppebbles. If you don’t already, head on over and subscribe!

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are the three books Jen chose…

R3C20 142 ostriches

142 Ostriches by April Davila
142 Ostriches is completely different than anything I’ve read this year. It is a debut novel with exquisite writing, characters that jump off of the page, and every single line is meaningful and important. This definitely helps you out of a reading rut when you need something different and special.
Jen’s Review of 142 Ostriches

R3C20 big lies in a small town

Big Lies in a Small Town by Diane Chamberlain
Read this for two strong female characters! This novel includes internal conflict, mystery, racial tension, and flawless descriptions of Edenton, NC. I was completely engrossed in the novel that is also rich with history and lessons.
Jen’s Review of Big Lies in a Small Town

R3C20 the pretenders

The Pretenders by Agatha Zaza
This novel tackles a huge variety of issues in a gripping and addictive way. This is a surprising story about flawed characters and all of the secrets they keep. It also begs the question, “what are you willing to tolerate to be with the one you love?”
Jen’s Review of The Pretenders

Thanks so much, Jen. I love the sound of all three books so they’re going straight on the wish list!

If Jen has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

142 Ostriches by April Davila
Big Lies in a Small Town by Diane Chamberlain
The Pretenders by Agatha Zaza

About Jen:
I’m a wife, mom, and dog mom in Roanoke, VA. I am always reading and more often than not, writing reviews!

Jen’s Blog and Social Media Links:
| Dandelions Inspired | Twitter @jenthomason1109Facebook |

If you’re a book blogger, bookstagrammer or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/kHTQeQdiUNZTsW4d6)

#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #BookBlogger Lisa from Read and Rated (@ReadandRated) #ReadandRated #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Welcome to Friday on damppebbles! The weekend is in touching distance and, as it’s Black Friday, bargains galore are to be had. But…asking for a friend…are books included in the Black Friday deals? 🤔

Today I am delighted to welcome a fabulous book blogger to share the book love. It’s the very lovely Lisa of Read and Rated. Lisa’s blog is absolutely gorgeous and well worth checking out. Head on over, say hi and hit the subscribe button.

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are the three books Lisa has chosen…

R3C20 The secrets of strangers

The Secrets of Strangers by Charity Norman
Such a simple concept and yet utterly spellbinding. I loved it. All the feels with this one.
Lisa’s Review of The Secrets of Strangers

R3C20 Three Hours

Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton
Ah this book! It broke me in places, being a mum of two boys will have had something to do with that… I just felt every emotion, it is a beautiful yet awful book. Wonderful.
Lisa’s Review of Three Hours

R3C20 stolen children

Stolen Children by Michael Wood
There is a missing child in this series and the author had made this feel so real that I am utterly desperate for him to be found. Fabulous crime thriller that I hope to one day see on TV – like Vera. This is a massively under appreciated series.
Lisa’s Review of Stolen Children

Three brilliant choices, thanks Lisa. I’ve read (and really enjoyed) Stolen Children and I have Three Hours on my terrifying TBR, which I can’t wait to read. And this is the second time we’ve seen The Secrets of Strangers so, along with She Lies Close by Sharon Doering and The Miseducation of Evie Epworth by Matson Taylor, it’s now in join first place! I wonder if one of these three books will be our eventual winner!

If Lisa has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

The Secrets of Strangers by Charity Norman
Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton
Stolen Children by Michael Wood

About Lisa:
I’m ‘that‘ girl, you know the one who always has her nose in a book. The one who always has a book on the go. The one who is reading a different book every time you ask her ‘what ya reading?’; I am her, she is me. I am also the girl who collects authors on twitter – you can find me there as @ReadandRated (where I mainly focus on books….) and also as @CoffeeCurls (where other stuff filters in too).

At ReadandRated.com you can find honest reviews and ratings for books. I also post reviews onto Good Reads, you can access my account there via the widget on the right had side of this blog, and I post reviews onto Amazon. If I review a book for you and you want a review posted onto a particular site just let me know.

Taking part in #R3COMM3ND3D has been difficult as it is SO hard to narrow the answers down to just three books. I would add to this that ANYTHING by Amanda Jennings, Jane Isaac, Lisa Hall, Simon Kernick, Stuart MacBride, Rob Ashman, Noelle Holten and Alison Bruce (to name but a few) is also highly recommended. [Ahem, hold up there! Are these extra #R3Cs?? Adjudictor…??? 😲😂]

I live very near Cambridge with my wonderful family which consists of one great bloke, two great boys and two purrrfect cats and a beautiful black Labrador. The rest of the time I am slightly fixated with cats, coffee and books.

Lisa’s Blog and Social Media Links:
| Read and Rated | Twitter @ReadandRated | Twitter @CoffeeCurls | Facebook | Instagram @readandratedbookreviews |

If you’re a book blogger, bookstagrammer or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/kHTQeQdiUNZTsW4d6)