#R3COMM3ND3D2020 with #Author Anne Coates (@Anne_Coates1) @urbanebooks #PerditionsChild #HannahWeybridgeSeries #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #publishedin2020

Hello and happy Thursday! It’s day 12 of #R3COMM3ND3D2020 – hurrah! Today I am delighted to welcome a brilliant author to share her three #R3COMM3ND3D2020 picks with us, it’s the very lovely Anne Coates who writes the Hannah Weybridge novels published by Urbane Books. I’ve read a number of the books in Anne’s series and they really are excellent. You can find out a little more about the latest, Perdition’s Child, a little later on.

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2020? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors, book bloggers and bookstagrammers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2020. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2020 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes. 😉

Here are the three books Anne has chosen for us…

R3C20 death of a mermaid

Death of a Mermaid by Lesley Thomson
The title intrigued me but I wasn’t prepared to be so engrossed by a narrative set in a small seaside town where a lot of the action centres on fishing and selling of fish!Fabulous build up of atmosphere as secrets come to light in an increasingly menacing atmosphere with an ending that will blow you away.

R3C20 rabbit hole

Rabbit Hole by Jon Richter
I loved the concept of an ex-journalist, Elaine Napier, now producing a podcast, The Frozen Files, to investigate a cold case murder. Katrin Gunnerasdottir disappeared five years previously, leaving her parents and boyfriend Marcus Dobson bereft and perplexed. Her body has never been found so she could still be alive… somewhere. The narrative begins slowly and gradually the reader is introduced to two lives being explored and investigated: Elaine’s and Katrin’s. The fact that the journo, who has dark secrets and a loss of her own, tries to follow in some of the victim’s footsteps adds an extra frisson of danger and complications and a dramatic dénouement.

R3C20 the smart womans guide to murder

The Smart Woman’s Guide to Murder by Victoria Dowd
This début tilts its hat at the Golden Age of detective fiction with the country house scenario from which there is no contact with the outside world when a snow storm engulfs the building. The fact that the characters hiring the house are members of a book group (with only one of them actually reading) who all seem to hate each other adds a dimension of dark humour amidst the murders which on the face of it are inexplicable…

Three very intriguing titles, thank you Anne. Some definite addtions to the terrifying TBR I think!

If Anne has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books recommended above, please see the following links:

Death of a Mermaid by Lesley Thomson
Rabbit Hole by Jon Richter
The Smart Woman’s Guuide to Murder by Victoria Dowd

About Perdition’s Child:Perditions Child

Dulwich library is the scene of a grisly murder, followed swiftly by another in Manchester, the victims linked by nothing other than their Australian nationality. Police dismiss the idea of a serial killer, but journalist Hannah Weybridge isn’t convinced.

She is drawn into an investigation in which more Australian men are killed as they try to trace their British families. Her research reveals past horrors and present sadness, and loss linked to children who went missing after the Second World War. Have those children returned now?

Once again Hannah finds herself embroiled in a deadly mystery, a mystery complicated by the murder of Harry Peters; the brother of Lucy, one of the residents of Cardboard City she had become friendly with. It soon becomes clear Lucy is protecting secrets of her own.

What is Lucy’s link to the murders and can Hannah discover the truth before the killer strikes again?

Anne Coates gripping thriller is the perfect read for fans of Emma Tallon, K.L.Slater and Laura Marshall.

| amazon.co.uk | amazon.com | Waterstones | hive.co.uk |

About Anne Coates:
Editor, journalist and author of the Hannah Weybridge crime thriller series plus collections of short stories and non-fiction.

Anne’s Social Media Links:
| Website | Twitter @Anne_Coates1 | Facebook | Instagram @anne_coates1 |

If you’re a book blogger, bookstagrammer or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/kHTQeQdiUNZTsW4d6)

#R3COMM3ND3D2019 with #Author Anne Coates (@Anne_Coates1) @urbanebooks #PerditionsChild #HannahWeybridgeSeries #damppebbles #BookRecommendations #Publishedin2019

Hello and welcome to damppebbles on the final day of November 2019. Today I am delighted to welcome a brilliant author to the blog, the fabulous Anne Coates. Anne writes the Hannah Weybridge series and I am a huge fan of her books. I was delighted to discover that the fourth book in the Hannah Weybridge series, Perdition’s Child, will be published by Urbane Publications on 6th February 2020 and is available for pre-order now! I heartily recommend Anne’s books so what are you waiting for?

So, what is #R3COMM3ND3D2019? It’s about sharing the book love. It’s a chance for authors and book bloggers to shout about three (yes, *only* three) books they love. They can be written by any author, in any genre and published in any way (traditionally, indie press or self-published). But there is a catch. All three books must have been published in 2019. To make things interesting I have added a couple of teeny, tiny rules this year which are; 1) the book must have first been published in 2019 and 2) special editions and reissues do not count. I like to keep you lovely people on your toes 😉.

Here are the three books Anne recommends…

the playground murders.jpg

The Playground Murders by Lesley Thomson
Loved the dual timeline and the personal connections between the present and the past for private detective Stella Darnell who also runs a cleaning company. Great characters and intriguing plot.

the second sleep.jpg

The Second Sleep by Robert Harris
For me this was an immense improvement on Conclave which I found repetitive and predictable. This one is cleverly set in a future in which most of the past has been obliterated. Central character Fairfax finds his belief, faith and history are all put to the test in a small isolated community.

a deathly silence.jpg

A Deathly Silence by Jane Isaac
A classy police procedural that is perfectly plotted and beautifully written. The reader is totally engaged from the discovery of the first body until the book’s terrifying climax. Third in Isaacs’ DI Helen Lavery series but easily read as a standalone.

Great choices, thank you Anne. I’m a huge fan of Jane Isaac’s books and hope to read A Deathly Silence soon. I’ll be adding your other two picks to my wishlist as well.

If Anne has managed to tempt you, or if you would like to find out more about the books she recommends, please see the following links:

The Playground Murders by Lesley Thomson
The Second Sleep by Robert Harris
A Deathly Silence by Jane Isaac

About Perdition’s Child:Perditions Child

Dulwich library is the scene of a grisly murder, followed swiftly by another in Manchester, the victims linked by nothing other than their Australian nationality. Police dismiss the idea of a serial killer, but journalist Hannah Weybridge isn’t convinced.

She is drawn into an investigation in which more Australian men are killed as they try to trace their British families. Her research reveals past horrors and present sadness, and loss linked to children who went missing after the Second World War. Have those children returned now?

Once again Hannah finds herself embroiled in a deadly mystery, a mystery complicated by the murder of Harry Peters; the brother of Lucy, one of the residents of Cardboard City she had become friendly with. It soon becomes clear Lucy is protecting secrets of her own.

What is Lucy’s link to the murders and can Hannah discover the truth before the killer strikes again?

Anne Coates gripping thriller is the perfect read for fans of Emma Tallon, K.L.Slater and Laura Marshall.

Pre-order your copy NOW! Out 6th February 2020
| amazon.co.uk | amazon.com | Waterstones | hive.co.uk |

About Anne Coates:
Editor, journalist and author of the Hannah Weybridge crime thriller series plus collections of short stories and non-fiction.

Anne’s Social Media Links:
| Website | Twitter @Anne_Coates1 | Facebook |

If you’re a book blogger or an author and you have three books published this year which you want to shout about then please complete the following form (or click this link: https://forms.gle/PE483qCyrKEgV5Uq6)

#BlogTour | #GuestPost: Dancers in the Wind by Anne Coates (@Anne_Coates1) @urbanepub

51spunndbkl-_sx324_bo1204203200_SHE IS HUNTING FOR THE TRUTH, BUT WHO IS HUNTING HER?

Freelance journalist and single mother Hannah Weybridge is commissioned by a national newspaper to write an investigative article on the notorious red light district in Kings Cross. There she meets prostitute Princess, and police inspector in the vice squad, Tom Jordan.

When Princess later arrives on her doorstep beaten up so badly she is barely recognisable, Hannah has to make some tough decisions and is drawn ever deeper into the world of deceit and violence. Three sex workers are murdered, their deaths covered up in a media blackout, and Hannah herself is under threat.

As she comes to realise that the taste for vice reaches into the higher echelons of the great and the good, Hannah realises she must do everything in her power to expose the truth …. and stay alive.”

I am thrilled to welcome you to my stop on the Dancers in the Wind blog tour and let me tell you…this is one fantastic book.  Dancers in the Wind is author Anne Coates debut thriller novel and I for one hope there is a lot more to come.

To celebrate the publication of Dancers in the Wind (which happened on 13th October 2016) I have a brilliant guest post from Anne Coates to share with you today.  Anne has written a fascinating piece which gives an insight into one of the many processes a book goes through before it reaches publication.  What a skill to have!

Gamekeeper turned poacher?
How editing and abridging books has informed my own writing

While I have been writing most of my life, I have also been an editor and an abridger of both fiction and non-fiction. This started with my staff job on Woman’s Weekly and Woman & Home and, after I went freelance, with Reader’s Digest (books) and Orion for their Compact Editions series and as a fiction consultant for a part-work.

I had to undergo training at Reader’s Digest – they have very specific rules and guidelines – and have worked for them for most of my freelance life. Every year they had a huge lunch party in London inviting publishers, agents, authors and celebrities. The first year I was invited I felt like I was the recipient of one of Willy Wonka’s golden tickets!

Meeting one of the authors I mentioned that I’d cut his novel. He and his wife exchanged a glance and I cursed myself for being an idiot. Then his wife said, “It was amazing. Try as we might, we couldn’t see what you’d cut out.” And that is what abridgers aim for – a shorter book where the reader can’t see the joins. Needless to say I was chuffed to bits.

Memoirs are often easier to cut as authors tend to give too many people their back-stories which are mostly superfluous. If my eyes glaze over during my first readings, it’s a sign that something needs to be cut.

The effect this has had on my own work is that I write succinctly.  This was a perfect style for my short tales with a twist and flash fiction but for my novels I have had to learn to expand and develop both characters and narrative.

My first draft often reads like a series of disconnected scenes and I rewrite and rewrite until I’m satisfied everything works. Even so mistakes can get through – even for the best writers. In Mill on the Floss, the dog changes sex halfway through the book!

Timelines are so important. When abridging a book, I probably read it at least six times and probably am more intimate with it by the end than the author. I found a plot flaw when working on Anna Karenina that would probably (and has) passed most people by. Plus another well-known author had an eleven-month pregnancy in her novel.

But just in case you think I am getting above myself, I realised recently while writing the sequel to Dancers in the Wind, that I’d included a real event, which had actually happened the year before Death’s Silent Judgement is set. It made me think of the biblical quote: “Do not judge, so that you may not be judged… Why do you see the speck in your neighbour’s eye, but do not notice the log in your own eye?”

So please forgive any logs of my own making – although I am sure the pros at Urbane Publications will have eliminated them.

Smith & Sons (9)

This is a very enjoyable novel which I devoured in the space of 24 hours.  No scrap that, it was more like 7 hours which for me, is super speed reading.  I couldn’t put it down.  Once I became immersed in Hannah and Caroline’s tale, I was hooked!  Before starting this book I wasn’t sure what to expect.  The cover suggested murder and violence but the title…didn’t!  I now know why the book is called Dancers in the Wind and I feel a little silly.  It all fits perfectly!

Freelance journalist Hannah Weybridge is working on a feature to coincide with the release of a television documentary featuring young prostitute, Princess and new copper on block, DI Tom Jordan.  The interview with Princess opens Hannah’s eyes and she hears things about life on the streets that she would prefer not to.  With DI Jordan it’s clear to see the sparks fly but Hannah is far too professional to make anything of it.  And DI Jordan has enough on his plate trying to solve the murder of a local prostitute. When the body of a second girl is found Tom is suddenly aware that the first murder was not the work of an overly frisky punter but something much more sinister.

Hannah meanwhile is getting on with her life, having forgotten all about the prostitute and the cop; she has a six month old daughter to care for and being a single mum she needs the phone to ring with more work.  But instead of the phone ringing, the doorbell rings late one night.  On her doorstep Hannah finds the badly beaten body of Princess, she’s barely alive.  Against her better judgement Hannah gives the girl shelter and cleans her up.  But what has Princess brought to Hannah’s door?  Are Hannah and her baby daughter safe? And will those responsible be held to account for their actions, or are they beyond the reach of the law…?

One of the things that stood out for me in this book is the fact that the main protagonist is a  journalist rather than a detective or PI.  She’s not really an investigative reporter either, she’s just a normal mum trying to do the best for her baby daughter.  That appealed to me and I found it refreshing (surely I’m not growing tired of my grumpy, addiction riddled cops…am I?).  Granted, DI Tom Jordan does feature quite heavily but he is by no means the star of the show.  This story belongs to Hannah and Princess (AKA Caroline).

It’s a gritty read and in some places quite shocking.  My attention was held from the opening chapters to the very end.  Once I’d finished the book I felt quite bereft and wanted more (there is a sequel on the way – no pressure, Anne Coates!).

This is another read where you suspect pretty much every character at one point or another.  I always enjoy books which use that formula as I’m always keen to hone my detective skills.

Would I recommend this book?  I most certainly would.  Brilliant characters with heaps of mystery to keep you guessing.  A thoroughly enjoyable and absorbing read.

Four and a half stars out of five.

Many thanks to Liz Barnsley, Urbane Publications, NetGalley and Anne Coates for providing me with a copy of Dancers in the Wind in exchange for honest review.

Dancers in the Wind by Anne Coates was published in the UK by Urbane Publications on 13th October 2016 and is available in paperback and eBook format | amazon.co.uk | amazon.com | Waterstones | Goodreads | Urbane Publications |

Smith & Sons (11)

annecoatesFor most of her working life in publishing, Anne has had a foot in both camps as a writer and an editor, moving from book publishing to magazines and then freelancing in both.

Having edited both fiction and narrative non-fiction, Anne has also had short stories published in a variety of magazines including Bella and Candis and is the author of seven non-fiction books.

Born in Clapham, Anne returned to London after graduating and has remained there ever since. In an attempt to climb out of her comfort zone, Anne has twice “trod the boards” – as Prince Bourgrelas in Ubu Roi when a student and more recently as a nun in a local murder mystery production. She also sings periodically in a local church choir and is relieved when she begins and finishes at the same time – though not necessarily on the same note – as everyone else. Needless to say, Anne will not be giving up her day job as an editor and writer.

Telling stories is Anne’s first love and nearly all her short fiction as well as Dancers in The Wind began with a real event followed by a “what if …” That is also the case with the two prize-winning 99Fiction.net stories: Codewords and Eternal Love.

Anne is currently working on the sequel to Dancers in the Wind.

Author Links:Twitter | Website | Blog |